Dali's "Daddy Longlegs of the Evening" referenced
Jean Delville's "Treasures of Satan",
and James Gleeson's "Galaxy" references both

Delville's Treasures of Satan, Dali's Daddy Longlegs of the Evening- Hope and Gleeson's Galaxy

Leading from  
and
James Gleeson 
and 
Salvador Dali 
and
"The Treasures of Satan" trail through the 1940s

Dali's "Daddy Longlegs of the Evening - Hope!'" (1940)

Jean Delville's Treasures of Satan
Jean Delville's Treasures of Satan and Dali's Daddy Longlegs Of The Evening - Hope!
The bird like creature in the distance from Treasures of Satan becomes
the held out arm of the cherub, and the toadstool beneath becomes a leg.
Faces from Treasures of Satan and "Daddy Longlegs of the evening hope"
(although of course Dali had been painting these downward faces for some time before)

Flowing sheet over arm in Treasures Of Satan and flower like parts in Daddy Longlegs Of The Evening
Perhaps the two gaps in the cloud showing the emerald background become
holes in the skin in the Dali painting and perhaps also the inkpots lying on top
of the body. The orange column of cloud next to the tentacle becomes an arm.

Tentacle from the Treasures of Satan "wing" and F-hole from violin in Daddy Longlegs Of The Evening - Hope!

Treasures of Satan and in Daddy Longlegs Of The Evening - Hope!. Dali created a wall around a tree and it's roughly inspired by a diagonal edge of the left of the pile of bodies and horizontally across the bodies going upwards to the righ, Perhaps one might want to attempt to match the lines up more accurately on the Delville painting and expect something like 57 degree angle with a 33 degree angle between the top and Satan's leg as some sort of Masonic reference and expect all kinds of fun and exciting geometrical statements to pop up since Delville was a member of the Rosicrucians, but it's not up to me to say that it would work.

a) 22nd June 2016:
A day came when I looked at James Gleeson's painting Galaxy from 1943 and noticed that Giger perhaps referenced this for Alien Monster IV and that it referenced Dali's Daddy Longlegs of the Evening- Hope together with Delville's Treasures of Satan and the realisation came that he the Dali painting referenced Delville's painting and that's why Gleeson was referencing the two together.

Gleeson's Galaxy




Dali's Daddy Longlegs of the Evening- Hope and Gleeson's Galaxy



Cherub with hand held out transforms into the face of a boy and the downward
face with the closed eye transforms into a block with shapes cut out.


The space beneath the horse and the angel's body opposite it in "Daddy Longlegs
of the evening - Hope!" becomes a carved out shape in Gleeson's Galaxy painting


figure drooping over tree branch playing a violin in
"Daddy Longlegs of the evening - Hope!" and comparable area in Gleeson's "Galaxy" 

b) Did Gleeson know about the connection with "Treasures of Satan"?
While it shows that Gleeson referenced "Daddy Longlegs of the evening - Hope!", there appears to be a glimmer of an idea that he shows off ideas inspired by Treasure's of Satan, that are perhaps not instantly comparable. In fact, looking at Gleeson's painting and seeing some similarities of Treasures of Satan made me realise that Dali's painting referenced Delville's painting.

The bent tips of the wing like tentacles on Satan become horn like forms projecting from the apple like structure and he shows off wings in the upper parts of his painting suggests wings.

The apple meanwhile has a bite in it and the remaining skin shown forms a crescent perhaps reminiscent of the sheet flowing down the front of the satanic being. Where his head would have been is now the bit in the apple.  However we might be able to compare the tentacles ends and the curling tendril of the vegetation of Gleeson's painting or might we assume that Gleeson extracted this from the F-holes in the violin

Delville's "Treasures of Satan" and  Gleeson's "Daddy Longlegs of the evening hope"

Detail from "Treasure's of Satan" and "Galaxy"

Detail from "Treasure's of Satan" and "Galaxy"

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