"Doctor Who and The Tomb of the Cybermen"
echoes in "Prometheus"?

leading from 



a) Comparisons to Doctor Who and The Tomb of the Cybermen

Comparisons can be made by between Prometheus and an old Doctor Who series "Tomb of the Cybermen" starring Patrick Troughton as the Doctor shown on TV in 1967. What it comes down to is the story of scifi twist on a Mummy horror film featuring an archeological expedition soon hijacked by the accompanying power hungry people who funded it an it's who want to bargain with the sleeping cyborg giants that have been asleep for hundreds of years in a tomb like complex but the cyborg giants don't give in to their plans.



b) Discovery of the ancient tomb

In Tomb of the Cybermen,  humans from Earth would be out to look for the remains of the Cybermen's civilisation on the desert like planet of Telos. Rather than a siege story, the writers came with a story about a trap for only the cleverest human to spring for the benefit of the cybermen who were going to convert him into a cyberman making use of his intelligence.  The story was also inspired by the interest in Egyptology, mainly interest in the tomb of Tutenkhamun. The writers turned to the old Universal Horror movie The Mummy starring Boris Karloff back in 1932 which was remade in 1959 with Christopher Lee as the mummified pharoah who is resurrected from the dead by a group of archaeologist , and seeks to resurrect his lover an Egyptian princess

c) Deep Frozen Cybermen

The cybermen had put themselves into a frozen state to survive and the human race would be drawn in by their inquisitiveness. What actually forced them to do this wasn't really made clear. Because the Doctor had destroyed their planet and then their machinery and supply of replacements had depleted, they were becoming extinct. Something that seemed to be important at the time of the making of this Doctor Who story was the fact that there was a big rumour in the newspapers in 1966 about Walt Disney's body been frozen, put into a state of cryogenic suspension, waiting for a cure for cancer and Walt Disney would have a second coming.

Christopher Lee and Peter Cushion
in Hammer's The Mummy (1959)


d) Von Danikenization
So with that there seemed to be a lot of interest in Erich Von Daniken investigating where spacemen could have landed and his book Chariots of the Gods would come out in 1968, the years after Tomb of the Cybermen was released. Gerald Davis back then was aware of Daniken's concept that there was the idea was that Spacemen in Pre-History had perhaps left clues which the human race would find out when they had advanced to a sufficient stage and this was the general idea behind Tomb of the Cybermen. The humans in the story only got inside because of their knowledge and primitive people would not have been able to get in, so the Cybermen would have use it as a trap to get these intelligent people and use them. It seemed almost as if the Prometheus scriptwriters had read the scriptbook for the Tomb of the Cybermen and noticed the Davis' words about about how the Cybermen left clues for the human race to find , pertaining to Von Daniken's idea.






In Prometheus,  the characters Elizabeth Watts and her partner Charlie Holloway archeologists discover reoccurring signs of a pattern in a cave painting and ancient tablets and other forms of ancient art.  It's assumed that these images being left behind as an invitation and once the human race had advanced enough, they might considered to be the strange circles in the pictures to be star systems and find one that looks similar leads to them to a planet across the galaxy.  And so they encounter a place that is a building left behind by another civilisation on a seemingly barren and deserted planet, and perhaps with the discovery of dead bodies, it might be nothing more than a tomb. As it happens though, when the humans awaken the sleeping giant, he doesn't seem to be interested in them at all other than having an urge to swat them like flies

e) See: Wreckless behaviour as catalyst for further events 

http://alienexplorations.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/prometheus-wreckless-behaviour-as.html


f) See: Hammerpede's Origins in Dr Who And The Tomb of the Cyberman's Cybermats

http://alienexplorations.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/prometheushammerpedes-origins-in-dr-who.html



g) Making a deal with the biomechanical giants
In Tomb of the Cybermen, Kaftan a member of the Brotherhood of Logicians, along with her colleague Klieg, and they have financed Doctor Parry's expedition to Telos, they turn out to be interesting in nothing but the actual Cybermen rather than the interior of the tomb like building. It comes to a point where Kaftan and Klieg hijack the mission with the use of force. Klieg working out the controls revives the Cybermen who have been in hibernation for 500 years. The leader is a fairly gigantic humanoid perhaps looking about seven foot, and the Klieg wants try to bargain with the Cyber Controller to gain power but in doing so meet their own doom. The Cybermen are an intelligent possibly humanoid race, who have replaced most of their body parts with plastics and mechanical parts. Their leader the Controller who is the most threatening of all, appears like a seven foot giant.
The Cybercontroller with enlarged veined dome.
The Cybercontroller grabs Klieg by the arm and almost crushes it, reducing him to his knees before throwing him backwards on the ground. The cybermen have set this whole thing as a trap to bring people of superior intellect in so that they could be turned into cybermen.

One of the Earth spaceship pilots who asks what they're going to gain from all of this. Kaftan replies "We are going to build a better world "

The Cyber Controller's plans are only to transform the human race into more cybermen


In Prometheus,  Once David has discovered a living giant asleep in his Egyptian sarcophagus like hibernation crypt, Peter Weyland the man who has built Weyland Corporation whose company slogan is "Building better worlds" is the person who has financed the expedition and has been revived from hibernation. This tall humanoid wears a suit that appears to be organic and technological but one can not work out wear it ends and the giants own flesh begins. Peter Weyland immediately takes over the expedition and to wake up the giant out of his hibernation and ask him how to extend his own life, but since the giant human is angered and everyone he can lay his hands on.

And then as it seems that the Engineer only has plans to take off in his spacecraft to travel to Earth and unleash on it a cargo of black stuff that perhaps will transform the human civilisation perhaps in the way that Fifield and Holloway had both begun to transform.



Source Quote
  1. This time the writers did not want to imagine a future rocket base or moon station, but get to explore Telos, the world of the Cybermen. For once , this was not going to be a siege story since the object was for the humans to get inside the base. Whether they would emerge from it depended upon the whims of the writers, They took their starting point  a classic horror movie called The Mummy, a film made in 1932, and remade more recently in 1959, where a group of archaeologists wake up an ancient evil. In the case of the Cybermen, it was going to be a trap for only the cleverest human to spring. It was a chance for the writers to imagine elaborate set up, and for Gerry to explore his favourite fear of claustrophobic tunnels based on a childhood experience in a coal mine, Above all , it gave them a chance to write another spooky horror serial, with a healthy dose of melodrama added to the mix. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  2. Egyptology is a very attractive image for children, so the deserts of Egypt would be the basis for the sandy wastes of Telos. There would be a sarcophagus of sorts in the Cybermen's recharging room, and bas relief illustrations of Cybermen were plastered all over their base. Since mummies are embalmed dead with some of their internal organs removed and kept in jars. It does not stretch the imagination too far to imagine how this relates to the Cybermen. They were to be found frozen in suspended animation within ice tombs deep below the surface of their city. Inevitably they would be awoken , and emerge from their tombs in a set piece scene. "There was something very evocative of the image of the Cybermen being all frozen up and breaking through the honeycomb-like membranes, "Gerry Davis explain in 1988. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  3. The Planet Telos , Five hundred years after the Cybermen were believed to have died out, a group of archaeologists from Earth visit the creatures' adopted planet and search for the entrances to their city. They uncover, instead , what appears to be their tomb. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  4. The Doctor, Jamie and Victoria join them in their exploration of the antechambers and Victoria finds an inactive device which the Doctor describes at a Cybermat. Upon discovering that their rocket has been sabotaged, the crew members are forced to spend the night in the central chamber. Possibly motivated by curiosity, the Doctor surreptitiously helps Eric Klieg to solve the logic puzzle at the main controls, and the gateway to the underground tomb swings open. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  5. The Doctor and his friends descend a ladder into the freezing tomb, and Klieg's fellow logician Kaftan closes the hatch behind them. Once underground, Klieg activates the levers that awaken the cybermen. They slowly emerge from their honey comb-like cells closely followed by the imposing form of their controller. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  6. The cybermen controller orders the release of the rat-like Cybermats to attack the humans on the other side of the hatch, but Klieg and Kaftan are undeterred. Klieg takes an x-ray laser from the weapons testing room, and opens the hatch. He keeps the Controller at bay with the gun, and offers him an alliance. The weakened Controller agrees, and Klieg allows him to stagger into a revitaliser for some much needed energy.(The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  7. Toberman follows the controller out of the tomb, but it soon becomes clear that he's been partially converted into a Cyberman. Toberman turns on the controller and Cybermen begin to swarm towards the reopened hatch. Jamie repels them with the X-ray laser, but the death toll leads the Doctor to a grim conclusion. Preparing to seal the Cybermen in their tomb forever, he once more descends underground. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  8. This time the writers did not want to imagine a future rocket base or moon station, but get to explore Telos, the world of the Cybermen. For once , this was not going to be a siege story since the object was for the humans to get inside the base. Whether they would emerge from it depended upon the whims of the writers, They took their starting point  a classic horror movie called The Mummy, a film made in 1932, and remade more recently in 1959, where a group of archaeologists wake up an ancient evil. In the case of the Cybermen, it was going to be a trap for only the cleverest human to spring. It was a chance for the writers to imagine elaborate set up, and for Gerry to explore his favourite fear of claustrophobic tunnels based on a childhood experience in a coal mine, Above all , it gave them a chance to write another spooky horror serial, with a healthy dose of melodrama added to the mix. (The Quest for Pedler: The Life & Ideas of Dr Kit Pedler)
  9. Egyptology is a very attractive image for children, so the deserts of Egypt would be the basis for the sandy wastes of Telos. There would be a sarcophagus of sorts in the Cybermen's recharging room, and bas relief illustrations of Cybermen were plastered all over their base. Since mummies are embalmed dead with some of their internal organs removed and kept in jars. It does not stretch the imagination too far to imagine how this relates to the Cybermen. They were to be found frozen in suspended animation within ice tombs deep below the surface of their city. Inevitably they would be awoken , and emerge from their tombs in a set piece scene. "There was something very evocative of the image of the Cybermen being all frozen up and breaking through the honeycomb-like membranes, "Gerry Davis explain in 1988. (The Quest for Pedler: The Life & Ideas of Dr Kit Pedler)
  10. Naturally, Kit build his own versions, Mark Pedlar remembers 'Dad used to build electric cats, mice, little Heath Robinson devices, very sophisticated for those days that would react to light. They were on wheels and their heads would move. He used to bring them home."
    (The Quest for Pedler: The Life & Ideas of Dr Kit Pedler)
  11. Gerry Davis : Tomb of the Cybermen was all very Freudian, with the symbolism of going down into the catacombs. It was an old-fashioned horror story with the breaking of the foetal membranes an added touch. That also gave us more scope with the Cybermats, who were based on silverfish. Although we devised them thinking mainly of the merchandise, they were also pretty horrific, with red eyes and the ability to leap up at you. (https://drwhointerviews.wordpress.com/category/gerry-davis/
  12. The original concept for the story was that, for an unspecified reason (following a presumably calamitous defeat), the Cybermen had retreated to their Tomb, their main idea for this story was that there had been lay a trap, designated to operated only after beings of a certain level of intelligence located the entrance to the tombs. (Doctor Who Scripts: The Tomb Of The Cybermen)
  13. Gerry Davis: At the time, there was a lot of interest in Erich Von Daniken investigating where spacemen could have landed. The idea was that Spacemen in pre-history had perhaps left clues which we would find out when we had advanced to a sufficient stage. This was basically the idea behind the Tombs. They only got inside because of their knowledge - primitive people could not get in. The Cybermen could then use the intelligent people. That was the theme, the trap... (Doctor Who Scripts: The Tomb Of The Cybermen)

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