Dali's “The Painter’s Eye” (1942) references the Henu Barque, and also Joan Miro's "Figures in the Night Guided by the Phosphorescent Tracks" from 1940?

leading from

 
Salvador Dali's “The Painter’s Eye” (1942)




a) Dali's “The Painter’s Eye” (1942) references the Henu Barque?


If so perhaps:

a. i) The Oryx horns become a car, and eye socket becomes the hole in the wall by the car. The upper kestrel head becomes a human shaped building with clock face, and the bull horns become the telephone.
 

a. ii) The vertical line structures with the three pillars become the poplar trees.
 

a. iii) Meanwhile this area is transforming into a homage to Böcklin's Isle of the Dead. Böcklin did five paintings with that title, the first of which I believe used the Henu Barque configuration.





a. iv) Perhaps The henu barque is also reversed to become the central eye figure.

a. v) The white piles of sand on the barge become the eye while the boar becomes the outstretched arms.


a. vi) A rudder becomes a paint brush, the fan becomes the strand of eyelashes held in the right hand and trailing to the right.

a. vii) The three pillars become the three upper eyelashes and with that the kestrel head becomes the telephone while also I have previously mentioned, the bulls horns becomes the telephone.

a. viii) The hairpins hanging from the tree branch echo also the three number from the three rudders and indeed the three pillars.




Joan Miro's "Figures in the Night Guided by the Phosphorescent Tracks" (1940)

b) Another significant painting from that time that may have entered the mix is Joan Miro's "Figures in the Night Guided by the Phosphorescent Tracks" from 1940

If so:

b. i) Here on the left of the blue image we have the outline of a distorted eye like form with horns with a point beneath it, that can be seen if you carefully look at the image, and I have decided that it was. his might even be the thing that inspires the chain of beads like dripping fluid beneath the eye.
 

b. ii) However, from a distance we have a dark blue form with a central red area that from a distance becomes like a central eye in itself and perhaps this in itself becomes the iris of the eye. 



b. iii) Vertical form transforms into car with wall 




b. iv) Fragment from Miro and tree from Dali painting. 

Notably the rectangle with a smaller intersecting rectangle transforms into the idea of the doors in the tree trunk. 

The fish like form transforms into the divide of the branches of the tree. 


b. v) See also: Joan Miro's "Figures in the Night Guided by the Phosphorescent Tracks" (1940)


c) References Gauguin's Mahana No Atua (Day of the God), (1894)?

Gauguin's Mahana No Atua (Day of the God), (1894)
I would also like to say that I think Dali was thinking about Gauguin's "Mahana No Atua (Day of the God)," from 1894 which is also in this Henu Barque trail

He would turn roof over the central idol into the telephone.

The boat being carried turns into the brush and also the doors in the tree .

The central green bush behind the central woman turns into the shape of the eye, while the woman and the two humans either side of her become the body with outstretched arms.


The reflections in the water turn into the fluid shadows. 

comparable areas of Gauguin's Mahana No Atua (Day of the God) and Dali's The Painter's Eye

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