Leonora Carrington's "And then we saw the daughter of the Minotaur, (1953)

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Leonora Carrington's "And then we saw the daughter of the Minotaur, (1953)
(Source: https://twitter.com/ameebroumand/status/770482255399706628)




a.i) Leonora Carrington's "And then we saw the daughter of the Minotaur, (1953)
Looks as if it references Wifedo Lam's Eternal Present, with the central seated figure with a heavily abstracted head that looks almost like a miniature shrine.
  • Wifredo's left woman has small horns and so there is a minotaur seated on the left here.
  • The right figure in Wifredo's work could almost be the full body with legs of a small woman merged with the upper torso of the full form of a large woman.
  • The small woman's hips become the large woman's shoulder and so perhaps the small woman has been separated.
  • The staff that she holds turns into a corridor in Carrington's painting where the woman with her featureless face is seen to dance.





a.ii) Man Ray's "Shakespearean Equation: Twelfth Night" in comparison to "And then we saw the daughter of the Minotaur, (1953)"
 

  • The paper sculpture with the single hole going right through it in the very centre of Twelfth Night becomes the green head dress of the upper seated figure 
  • The pink device on the bottom left has T shaped supports on either side and so the far support with two ovals on either side of it become the children's heads in Carrington's painting.
  • The penis shape on the far right behind the mathematical sculpture becomes a lit entrance on the far right of Carrington's painting 
  • Various circular forms including the ostrich egg in Man Ray's work becomes glass spheres in Carrington's painting 
  • The blue mathematical sculpture and the sculpture it's sitting on come the minotaur. The inner curve of the blue sculpture become the horns.
  • These mathematical sculptures with their inner gaps also become the pillars and the chamber with its roof and windows. 


André Masson's Dans la tour du sommeil, (1938)




a.x) In André Masson's "Dans la tour du sommeil", on the right, the pillar of the harp has plant like tendrils wrapped around it, and on the far left in Carrington's painting, a pillar has a creeping plant wrappd around it in a similar way




http://alienexplorations.blogspot.co.uk/1979/07/dalis-daddy-longlegs-of-evening.html
James Gleeson's "Galaxy" (1943)




a.xi) Meanwhile Gleeson's Galaxy provided a red fruit with white horns that might have become the colour scheme for this minotaur.



Astounding Fiction, April 1949 by Santry.
 a.iv) References the cover for Astounding Fiction, April 1949 by Santry.
  • The man with the open arms becomes the bull's head. 
  • Various bubble helmets become the glass baubles.   
  • It's as if Leonora Carrington saw similarity between elements of Lam's painting and the Astounding Fiction cover. Perhaps she had the idea that the magazine cover was another one of the Treasures of Satan inspired works.
  • The glass structure becomes integrated into the head dress.
  • The towering glass form in the background becomes integrated into the head of the central figure.


Similarity between elements of Lam's painting, the Astounding Fiction cover and Carrington's minotaur.
The glass structure becomes integrated into the head dress. The towering glass form in the background becomes 
integrated into the head of the central figure.


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