Henu Barque no. 2
at the Temple of Rameses III
at Medinet Habu

leading from :

stitched image that features thr Henu Barque, the actual frieze is divided by a corner,
from Medinet Habu, Volume 4. Festival Scenes of Ramses III (OIP 51).
(My Source: image discovered in the forum at http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/)




stitched image that features the Henu Barque, the actual frieze is divided by a
corner, from Medinet Habu, Volume 4. Festival Scenes of Ramses III (OIP 51).
(My Source: image discovered in the forum at http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/)

Henu Barque at the Temple of Rameses III at Medinet Habu 
 (Fig 7 from "The Veiled Image of Amenapet" in 
"Effigies dei: essays on the history
 of religions")


Note of Comparison between the veiled image of Amenapet of Djeme and the Henu Barque at the Temple of Rameses III at Medient Habu "Another possibility appears when one notices the similarity of the veiled image of Amenapet of Djeme to the image of another god, Amenapet of Fjeme was linked with the underworld, the realmo of the dead. It has been explained already that Djeme was considered as necropolis. It is there that life is regenerated and renewed. Common people did expect to receive abundance of food in this life, and prosperity in the hereafter, from this popular god (Doresse, op. cit, [180]), who embodied renewing of life himself. That is congruent with the very 'frozen moment' of Amenapet of Djeme lifted up in his litter. The way he is depicted recalls the image of the god Sokaris. The latter god is of the dead in the Necropolis of Memphis, and was worshipped by the craftsmen in the necropolis in its mortuary workshops. He is portrayed as a mummy with a halcon's head. From the new kingdom on, he (Sokar) has been represented squatting in a chapel in the middle of his Henu-Bark, his head emerging from what is named a 'conical object' (Bonnet, op, cit. , 723; Lexicon der Aegyptologie V, 1067) , but looks like a veil of  ample proportions. Could the veil of Amenept of Djeme be, as well  as Sokaris's a sort of shroud (Lexicon der Aegyptologie, III, 995-996.  The veil of Fig. 6 is named 'djamet', Wörterbuch de Agyptischen Sprache,  V, 354.17-18: 'Binde als Hülle des Götterbildes; Mumienbinde'. Cf A. Moret,  Le rituel du culte divin journalier en Egypte, Paris 1902, 188.  In the  Ptolemeic dedication text of the temple of Medinet Habu this word is used for the etymology of the name Djeme. (K. Sethe, Amun und die acht Urgötter von Hermopolis, Berlin 1929, 54, note 1). Though the name Djeme has been known from the Twenty-first  Dynasty (1075-945 B.C.) on, the first representation of the veiled  Amenapet of Djeme dates from the Twenty-sixth Dynasty (664-610 B.C.).  A relation between the name of the necropolis of Medinet Habu and  the veil of the god should be precluded for this reason) , the function of  which might be to symbolize the regeneration of the god? The long  wide cloak which is worn by a deceased on a mythological papyrus  from Twenty-first Dynasty (1075-945 B.C. See image below)) should probably be interpreted in the same way. (A. Piankoff and N. Rambova, Mythologival Papyri, Chicago 1957, Pl. 19, scene 7, and p. 162: 'The deceased stands wrapped in a long cloak in which is depicted the head of a lion'. 'This figure symbolized the regeneration and rising of the deceased' (E. Hornung, Der Eine und die Vielen, Darmstadt 1971, 125, note 76. For processions with visible statues carried by priests, see H. Bonnet, op. cit, 613). The so called wesekh-collar is worn by the veiled Amenapet of Djeme. See Doresse , op. cit., [160]. For the lion as symbol of resurrection , see C. de Wit, Le role et le sens dans l'Egypte ancienne, Leiden 1951, 158-172) This shroud would then appear as a symbol for the renewal to come of the dead, an idea very familiar to the ancient Egyptians" (Effigies dei: essays on the history of religions, The Veiled Image of Amenapet, p7
 Amun-Ra wearing a veil or cloak on his shoulders, 
which is being offered to him by a priest (fig 6 from 
"The Veiled Image of Amenapet"in 
"Effigies dei: essayson the of religions")

deceased in long wide cloak. (Fig 8 from "The Veiled 
Image of Amenapet" in "Effigies dei: essays on the history of religions")
Censing the Henu boat of Sokar
Pen and ink; black, gold and silver. 19 x 32cm. 1997
by Jenny Carrington - artist
Festival of Sokar, represented in relief on the wall of the 
second court of the Temple of Ramesses III, at Medinet Habu. 
source: post by usernamed Menkheperra at the forum at
http://www.egiptoantiguo.org/

source: post by usernamed Menkheperra at the forum at 
http://www.egiptoantiguo.org/

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