The Beast with Metal Teeth

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a) Metal teeth of Phantom of Paradise
In 1974, The Phantom of Paradise was released featuring a phantom played by William Finlay with an owl like helmet, and teeth made from metal made by movie make up artist Tom Burman. His next door neighbour was a dental technician who specialised in making metal plates that went between teeth and this made Tom think "Metal teeth would be kind of cool."

b) Steel teeth of Jaws
And so Tom Burman went on to supply metal teeth for Richard Kiel, an actor whose body height was 7 foot 2 inches appeared as the character named Jaws in the movie "The Spy Who Loved Me" in 1977, and the character's teeth were made from steel and he could bite through cable.

The idea of the character Jaws came from film producer Albert Broccoli, and he described the character as having teeth like pliers, like tools, or like a shark – they weren’t sure and so they hired a friend of Keel's, a special effects make-up guy named John Chambers, to come up with what he thought would be what they would like but  Mr Broccoli didn’t like it. So they had a dental technician out near Pinewood try out and he liked it, and they remain in a museum in the UK.


c) Metal jaws of Giger's Alien
In the Alien production, they also opted to give the Alien inner and outer sets of teeth that were supposed to be steel, although in the end were chrome plated polyester. For Giger is showed that the monster was both human and mechanical, although still the creature for him was more human than mechanical. However,  giving him steel teeth was a way of conveying this two-fold nature.


Quote sources
  1. Tom Burman: I did the phantom's teeth, the guy next door was a dental technician who specialized in making metal plates to go between teeth, and that made me think, "Metal teeth would be kind of cool." I also did the metal teeth for Richard Keel as Jaws in James Bond movies, The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, although I believe that John Chambers was given credit (Fangoria 335,p21)
  2. Cinefantastique: What about the metal jaws? What inspired those?
    Giger: I did that myself. Those teeth are also in polyester. They were chrome-plated, so as to give them a metallic shine. I imagined them that was because for me the monster is both human and mechanical - more human than mechanical, though. So giving him steel teeth was a way to convey this two-fold nature (Cinefantastique vol 9: no.1)
  3. Detroit-born Kiel appeared as the metal-mouthed henchman with a killer bite in two James Bond films – the 1977  film The Spy Who Loved Me and the 1979 movie Moonraker.He was cast in the role of Jaws by American film  producer Albert “Cubby” Broccoli.
    He said he would only wear the metal teeth that sealed his place in Bond history for a few minutes because they hurt his mouth and were “nauseating”.
    Kiel, famed for his 7ft 1.5ins stature, said: “[Jaws] It was Mr Broccoli’s idea, he described the character as having teeth like pliers, like tools, or like a shark – they weren’t sure and they hired a friend of mine, a special effects make-up guy named John Chambers, to come up with what he thought would be what they would like and Mr Broccoli didn’t like it. So they had a dental technician out near Pinewood try out and he liked it. They are now in a museum here in the UK."
    They weren’t painful to wear but they were nauseating to wear, chrome, heavy in the roof of your mouth – they were gagging. It was all I could do to keep them in for more than two minutes at a time.
    Commenting on his on-screen adversary Roger Moore he said of the actor: “Roger Moore was a real gentlemen, a real nice guy. His heart was bigger than his ego. He let Jaws steal scenes and he helped me do it – he couldn’t care less as long as people were entertained and the movie was fun.(http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)

Nostromo

Henu Barque at the Egyptian Theatre

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and 


a)  The Original Henu Barque at the Egyptian Theatre
Above the East wall doorway of the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood is a depiction of the Henu Barque. The doorway doesn't actually open , and in an old postcard it is presented as the entrance to the Egyptian Theatre. What this image is based on is another question. The photos show it to be green and yellow while a postcard from the 1930s shows it to be blue. A 1946 photo shows what should the falcon head to be like a cobra head because it is not complete.


1930s post card of the entrance of the Egyptian Theatre,
but this is the east wall with a false door
(http://ein-bleistift-und-radiergummi.tumblr.com/post/34917777755)

The Henu Barque appears to be blue in this postcard


Photo from 1947, (source: https://sites.google.com/site/hollywoodtheatres/egyptian-1)

Falcon head on top of the fetish almost resembling a cobra

b) Disappearance of the Henu Barque by 1979. 
However at a later date, at a time when the foyer had been extended to where the pillars were and a hieroglyphic mural had been put up, the Henu barque looks as if it had been painted out completely by 1979. When was it last there and had it been painted anywhere else since? Wings can be seen over the doorway painted much lower down than the previous falcon's and with darker wings.
(See also Alien premieres at the Egyptian theatre in Hollywood, (1979))



Space Jockey in the courtyard
photo credit: William Malone 

The other side of the wing can be seen above the door

c) The Henu Barque since 1998
In the modern version of this image the simplified antelope head almost resembles a long beaked wattled birds head.  However it seems as if they have turned the cobra falcon head on top of the fetish on he barque into a head of an pharoah and painted the heads either side in the same way.  The main body of the barque is green and yellow, with L shapes between the vertical white supports.


Henu Barque At the Egyptian Theatre, Hollywood
Henu Barque At the Egyptian Theatre, Hollywood (detail)



Henu Barque At the Egyptian Theatre, Hollywood

Henu Barque At the Egyptian Theatre, Hollywood (detail)


falcon head turned into something not quite

3D Google Earth Image showing the placement of the door
with Henu Barque image above it

Alien premieres at the Egyptian Theatre in 1979

leading from

a) Alien opened at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood on May 25th, 1979


http://thedaarkone.tripod.com/a1_behind-scenes.html




http://thedaarkone.tripod.com/a1_behind-scenes.html


b) At the premiere in the courtyard , various props from Alien were on display including the Space Jockey and the eggs until vandals destroyed them by fire days later.


Alien eggs (http://www.fromscripttodvd.com/70mm_in_los_angeles_egyptian.htm)
Alien egg
(Source: Bill Malone, Facebook)

Alien eggs (http://thedaarkone.tripod.com/a1_behind-scenes.html)
Alien eggs (Photo: Bill Malone)

 The Space Jockey
http://www.fromscripttodvd.com/70mm_in_los_angeles_egyptian.htm


Space Jockey in the courtyard
(photo credit : William Malone)
 The Space Jockey
http://prologue.blog.naver.com/PostView.nhn?blogId=leonjuhee

Space Jockey in the courtyard
photo credit: William Malone 
Space Jockeyt telescope
photo credit: William Malone 

The Space Jockey
(Soirce: Bill Malone, Facebook)
The Space Jockey
http://prologue.blog.naver.com/PostView.nhn?blogId=leonjuhee
The Space Jockey
(Source: Bill Malone, Facebook)
Space Jockey (source geektyrant.com)
The space jockey (photo: Bill Malone)

The Space Jockey
(Source: Bill Malone, Facebook)


derelict ship model (source http://cinriter.livejournal.com/192203.html)

Derelict entrance model  (source http://cinriter.livejournal.com/192203.html)


Hypersleep chamber model  (source http://cinriter.livejournal.com/192203.html)

Space Jockey chamber model  (source http://cinriter.livejournal.com/192203.html)

egg chamber model  (source http://cinriter.livejournal.com/192203.html)



 Part of the Mother set
http://www.fromscripttodvd.com/70mm_in_los_angeles_egyptian.htm

 Part of the Mother set

http://alienexplorations.blogspot.co.uk/1979/05/alien-premieres-at-egyptian-theatre-in.html

Obvious kit sprue

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  1. Bill Pearson: A lot of insert shots were shot at the end where everyone says," Hey! Isn't that a load of kit bits and sprues?" This is the scene where Ripley ejects the Alien from the Narcissus, and there is a closeup of buttons being pushed on a control panel.

    One of the model makers who will remain nameless to save his blushed was standing by on the stage that evening when it was being shot. He was asked to dress around the buttons to apply some interesting detail on the panel

    Unfortunately the guy was not a wiggeter, but he didn't want to say no. He picked up some very obvious kit sprue, sprayed it silver and stuck it on. When I walked in the next day, I said, "what the hell is that?" I was told it was a case of you wouldn't see it on the screen, I still cringe about it now.
    (Sci-Fi  Fantasy Models #48, p28)

Inspired by Moebius for refinery platform

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a. ) A major inspiration for Ridley Scott were drawings by Moebius as featured in the comic book Metal Hurlant (and it's American counterpart Heavy Metal) that Ivor Powell introduced him to while while filming The Duellists in Dordoigne.
  1. The writer of this blog recalls from memory of the Memories of Alien interview at the Empire Big Screen, 2011.





b. ) When Ridley made the sudden jump to having Nostromo's refinery platform as a large squarish shape we might ask where Ridley took the inspiration and we can see it clearly enough in this comicbook story a likely answer.

In Moebius' story "It's a small universe" a couple of star travellers travel in a smallish space craft that appears to be a squarish platform with a support pylone extending beneath to connect with the lower horizontal tube which has the cockpit bubble situated at the front of it

The first image from the comicbook story shown here reveals the vessel approaching a planet somewhere out in space and the others of it landing on the planet. This craft comes to rest with the upper rectangle floating in the water with the rest submerged.

sideview of space ship



early Ridleygram of the refinery

c. Ridley's early storyboard known as a "Ridleygram" of the refinery before the planet appears to show a wide straight platform with similar sized attachments beneath the structure held by slanted support pylon
The original Starship Enterprise
d. i. Moebius' spacecraft is most likely a general parody of the original Star Trek's Starship Enterprise, but as a small space ship and with a rectangular top instead.

ii. Star Trek art Director Matt Jefferies designed the original Enterprise, which in series creator Gene Roddenberry's first series outline drafts was named Yorktown. Jeffries' experience with aviation led to his Enterprise designs being imbued with what he called "aircraft logic". (source: wikipedia)