Prometheus: Fifield found rolled up

leading from
Mutant Fifield with legs wrapped over his shoulders (Cinefex #130, p49)
a) Fifield found transformed
When Fifield in his transformed state returns to the Prometheus, he is found with his legs hideously bent over over his shoulders. My initial thought was that this was a play with the idea of what the organic box Alien scene that Dan O'Bannon mentioned had been filmed and cut out, but Walter Simonson had seen it in a rough cut and so included it in Alien: The Illustrated story. Ridley's original storyboard simply states that he is crouching and had the idea of the character possibly being in a pit and dressed in other body parts. With his lower body in a put, they draped dummy legs over his shoulders.

Ridley's Storyboard



b) Differences from Fifield
The alien as a box is a little bit different from what is happening to Fifield, his whole body appears to be bent backwards below ground level in a way that isn't human, and the upper legs are bent backwards as well. So what Walter Simonson saw in the alien folded up into an organic box seat appears to have the same sort of impact to tell us that there's something not quite humanoid about the body of this vaguely humanoid (See organic box like thing)


"organic box-like thing " from Alien the Illustrated Story

c) Froudian curiosity
The idea seemed to be very much carried over from an idea from Ridley Scott's Tristan And Iseult where a goblin labeled as a "Froudian" after Brian Froud is seen crouching curled up with its knees over its shoulders. (See also Origins of Ridley's compacted alien idea?)


"Froudian" (detail from image from Tristan And Iseult)

Prometheus: Ultramorph

leading from

a)  Introducing the Ultramorph
In his Alien Engineers script, Jon Spaihts included the monster creature The Ultramorph, it erupts from the space jockey/ engineer in the derelict as a chestburster and withing a short time grows to man height before leaving the confines of the crashed derelict ship known as the Juggernaut, and then hunts the character Shaw down amongst the wreckage of the Magellan, (soon to be renamed at the Prometheus). The creature impales her thigh with its tale as if it were a spear, and as this thing is about to kill her she rams a diamond bladed saw into it's face and kills it. It bleeds green acid blood. Despite this thing bleeding such a corrosive substance, she brings the head with her as a hunting trophy to hang over the door at the Vickers module. In this version of the script, he didn't actually describe it with any particular detail.



b) Ultramorph as the spacejockey's chestburster
It appears that Carlos Huante initially worked on some designs for the creature known as the Ultramorph,  the fully grown biomechanical version of the alien that was supposed to have chestbursted itself from an Engineer, and in the earlier script, this Engineer would have been the space jockey from the original Alien movie but one that was a tall humanoid within a suit that gave the Space Jockey it's strange look. Perhaps this creature would have grown to about fifteen feet in height assuming that the humanoid in the pictures below is of regular human height.
 


c) The return to Necronom IV
Designing these Ultramorphs meant going back Giger's painting Necronom IV and designing and Alien creature with a head even more similar to the one shown in Necronom IV than Giger's Alien would finally have. Carlos went as far as to include the bulbous black eyes in one version however in other versions he would include a greater swelling in the front of the dome around the face as if it had a bulbous forehead. Carlos kept on with designing variations of this it for a while before he had thoughts with Ridley about taking the creature concept in a different direction.




d) Ultramorph as being the evil angels
Carlos wrote in his notes about how The Ultramorph - unlike the "Alien" from the first Alien which were covered / or had an exoskeleton, the Ultramorph should still be covered with skin as genetically it is still "New"... and its host are the engineers. It would be an evil variant of the Engineers that would be in a sense Angels.  Also it was decided that the Ultramorphs should still have a regal Quality about them as that quality has been inspired by their host. So, to carry the "No Bones" motif.



e) Ultramorphs being clean and skin covered
However instead of the Ultramorphs being clean and skin covered, after some discussion with Ridley and what needs to happen sequentially with the story of how we end up with this "Alien" in the first film. Carlos thoughts about what if the engineer technology is all that ribbing and boney architecture that's all over the ship  and the "Alien" itself. So... the "Aliens" that come out or are born out of the humans should be clean and the skin covered because they are not saturated with he Genetic material of the source (Engineers) yet. So, they are more human looking, the "Ultramorphs" should be the first we see of the boney Exoskeleton on a creature.


f) Engineer technology would form as water
Almost as if he were talking about casting the alien suit in latex rubber, he imagined that the engineer technology would form as water (Milky Liquid) that pours unnaturally upward and over them (The Engineers) to form boney plating or ribs, and architectural surfaces. As if they they control it at a molecular level. How though the biomechanics becomes infused with the alien ultramorph itself remains unclear.
Quote sources
  1. Carlos Huante (talking about the development of the Deacon by way of the Ultramorph): The genesis of that character came after a  conversation I had with Ridley about a design progression of the  creatures to the Xenomorph of the first film. I went home and thought  about it but kept on with the Gigeresque Ultramorphs. Then as I worked I thought “wouldn’t it be cool if these Aliens who are born  of humans and haven’t been mixed genetically with the Engineers yet would look  more human and less biomechanical“, of course this was for a  different version of the script but that’s where the Deacon (or Bishop, as he was originally named) came from. He later became an Ultramorph and as the script changed slightly after I left the show, it became that thing at the end.   (Carlos was talking about the development of the Deacon by way of the Ultramorph in an interview with ThisBethesdaSea for www.avpgalaxy.net)
  2.  Carlos Huante: The Ultramorph - unlike the "Alien" from the first Alien which were covered / or had a exoskeleton, the Ultramorph should still be covered with skin as genetically it is still "New"... and its host are the engineers. it would be an evil variant of the (ANGELS) Engineers. Ultramorphs should still have a regal Quality about them as that quality has been inspired by their host. So, to carry the "No Bones" motif. (Carlos Huante's Prometheus notes)
  3. Carlos Huante: Okay, so instead of the Ultramorphs being clean and skin covered, after some discussion with Ridley and what needs to happen sequentially with the story of how we end up with this "Alien" in the first film. I'm thinking that what if the engineer technology is all that ribbing and boney architecture that's  all over the ship  and the "Alien" itself. So... the "Aliens" that come out or are born out of the humans should be clean and the skin covered because they are not saturated with the Genetic material of the source (Engineers) yet. So, they are more human looking, the "Ultramorphs" should be the first we see of the boney Exoskeleton on a creature. The engineer tech should form as water (Milky Liquid) that pours unnaturally upward and over them (The Engineers) to form boney plating or ribs, and architectural surfaces. Like they control it at a molecular level.(Carlos Huante's Prometheus notes)
  4. INT. JUGGERNAUT - PILOT CHAMBER On the floor, DAVID’s eyes open. With his jaw he hitches his severed head around. Gets his eyes on the Sleeper. In the pilot chair, the Sleeper convulses. An ALIEN erupts from his chest. Big as a wolf even at its birth. Dark gray, armored, lethal. More hideous than any chestburster we've seen. An ULTRAMORPH. It wails hideously. The Sleeper dies. The Alien slithers free (Alien_ Engineers, Jon Spaihts, p110)
  5. LATER Watts is awakened by a beeping alarm. She looks at her wrist. Her suit flashes an oxygen warning: 20 MINUTES REMAINING. She looks up. The Juggernaut's doors are wide open in front of her. The ULTRAMORPH ALIEN emerges from the Juggernaut. As large as a man already. It sees her. With a sob of terror she pulls herself to her feet and runs.(Alien_ Engineers, Jon Spaihts, p112-113)
  6. EXT. MAGELLAN CRASH SITE - DUSK Watts flees through the storm, across the burning debris field. A wilderness of lightning, fire, and twisted metal. A thunderstorm with dust instead of rain. She looks back through the darkness. In a strobe-light flicker of lightning, she sees a gray demon approaching through the wreckage. She scrambles through a section of ductwork...under a hull fragment...running and clambering... The Alien hunts her, cat-and-mouse, among the fragments of the Magellan: corridors that go nowhere, shattered compartments. Jetsam. Her eyes sweep frantically through the stormy night: searching for a weapon. A hiding place. An answer. She stumbles into the remains of the Magellan's laboratory. A hypersleep freezer lies on the barren ground. Watts climbs inside. Pulls the lid shut. The Alien passes by, inches away. She watches it through the plexiglass, holding her breath. The Alien roots in the wreckage. Finds the rotting Engineer's head among the shards of its vat. It begins to feed on the head - GROWING as she watches. Her suit’s oxygen alarm goes off again. 15 MINUTES REMAINING. The beeping draws the Alien away from its dead meat. Watts is paralyzed. The Alien noses closer. Sniffs at the plexiglass case. With sudden, horrific violence, it lashes out. Sends the freezer flying. Watts tumbles out. Lurches to her feet and runs. The Alien follows. Ravening. She leads it a twisting chase through fragments of burning metal. Watts trips and falls hard. Picking herself up, she sees she’s tripped over a HULL SAW - the same diamond-bladed tool DAVID used to dismantle the terraforming engine. She seizes the saw - straining to manage its weight. Hides in the hollow of a massive girder. The Alien passes by. Scenting the air. She freezes. Her arms trembling with the weight of the saw. Waiting for it to pass. Almost it leaves. But a tiny rattle of metal from the quivering saw brings it back. Out of options, Watts powers up the saw. The blade whines up to speed. They lunge at one another in the same moment. The diamond blade shears off one of the Alien’s claws. The monster screams and recoils. Its lashing tail sends Watts sprawling. She loses the saw. The Alien comes after her, slinking low to the ground, injured arm tucked to its chest. All vengeful fury. Watts scrambles for the saw. The Alien leaps for her. She rolls aside - and like a scorpion the Alien impales her thigh with its spear-tipped tail. Nails her to the ground. Watts screams in agony. Reaches for the saw, still buzzing on the ground. Its grip tantalizing inches from her fingertips. The Alien stoops over her, slavering face inches from her faceplate. Its hideous jaws open. With all her strength, Watts pulls against the spike in her leg. Drags the point of the spear through the dirt. Excruciating pain. She snarls through her teeth. The Alien strikes - just as Watts GRABS the saw. She meets the Alien’s head with the buzzing blade. IMPALES THE ALIEN’S SKULL. A gout of green acid onto Watts’s helmet. The Alien falls aside, thrashing its death-throes, the saw still growling. Watts sees ACID COMING THROUGH HER HELMET - fast. With frantic haste she unlatches her helmet. Wrenches it off as it crumples and melts. She stands bare-headed in the toxic air. Desperate, she looks around with tearing eyes. In the distance she sees an intact module of the Magellan. She runs for it. Slaps the door switch. Incredibly, it opens. (Alien_ Engineers, Jon Spaihts, p113-114)
  7. EXT.VICKERS MODULE-DAY
    Watts arrives at the Vickers module. The ultramorph Alien’s head has been fixed like a grisly trophy above the door. (Alien_ Engineers, Jon Spaihts, p116)

The Deacon

Deacon puppet
a) Originally known as the Ultramorph, this final incarnation of the Prometheus mutations was always intended to be a missing link of sorts between this film and the films of the Alien series. Effectively the unholy offspring of all the infected victims who came before it. Ridley Scott dubbed this creature the Deacon, based on the pointed shape of its head, similar to a Bishop's hat.

b) This thing would represent the beginning of Giger's alien, although it did not directly resemble the creature. They went through a long design process with Ridley, who was really wanted something as good as Giger's design, and they were trying to see what they could come up with.

c) Ivan Manzella has been established as one of the key sculptors along with Julian Murray. Together they created the deacon sculpture over a weekend late in the production schedule and they went to a fill-sized sculpt. Ridley came in several times to give them feedback and direction, and they ended up with a creature about the size of a six-year old child

d) Scanlan's team built two versions of the deacon, a soft puppet that fit inside an embryonic sac, and an articulated  rod puppet, both produced in silicone. Supervising mold modeler Daniel Meaker compressed the soft puppet into a three-foot-diameter latex bal­loon, and then added a mixture of metallic and organic based pigments and silicone birth matter. The balloon fit inside a hollow animatronic dummy of the dead Engi­neer, which Vanessa Bastyan and Catherine Fleming fabricated with an articulated ribcage and internal organs. Puppeteers operated the Engineer dummy from beneath the set, causing the body to convulse and emit the newborn.


e) The Deacon's pointed head burst through the ribcage and split it open. Then with an enormous heave, it rolls out onto the floor like a calf being born. They they brought in the rod puppet,  which had a lot of visible controls, but Ridley loved it. He ignored the technicalities and just went with it.

f) Richard Stammers staged clean plates of the deacon camera setups, but the birth played mainly as a practical effect with digital enhancement. The first shot after the birth is practical,  but with digital rod removal. With the puppert serving as blocking for performance, they matched the CO animation to the puppet. Weta replicated the deacon and augmented tendons in the creature's neck, which tense as the creature stands on fragile legs and then emits a roar, revealing a telltale second inner jaw based on the long protrusible jaw of the deep sea Goblin Shark, the Deacon's secondary jaw ends the film with the nightmarish hint of possible horrors to come.

g)  Ridley actually wanted the secondary mouth animation to reference the action of a goblin shark, which can dislocate it’s jaw and launch it forward to catch its prey. They needed to redesign the whole mouth and lower jaw to give the structure to build in the mechanics of this action. For this they went back to reference Giger’s original work and added in his details, which their sculpting team led by Florian Fernandez designed.

h) The deacon’s skin is slightly pearlescent. They wrote a custom shader for the way the pearlescense reacts with the light. There is also a layer of blood, mucus and liquid all over the skin, which gave them a layered shading model to get the complexity of the material qualities of the skin. The lighting was a continuation of the strobing lighting and was carefully matched to the clean plates by leads Florian Schroeder and Adam King

The Deacon maquette

i) In a version of the script by Jon Spaihts, Alien: Engineers, as the Ultamorph, after Shaw and she impales impales an Alien creature's skull with a diamond bladed saw and kills it.  This creature would be renamed in the scripts as the Deacon and quite possibly would be said to be a creature filling out a different role from that of the earlier intended Ultramorph. It is said in the picture gallery in the Prometheus Blu-Ray set that the Deacon creature was originally intended to have more screen time, pursuing Shaw and David to the second Juggernaut ship, narrowly missing them as they leave the planet at least not showing how easy it was to kill.

j) Deacon Blues
The final Deacon creature for some reason is coloured blue. We might think about the band Deacon Blue with the name inspired by the song title Deacon Blues by Steely Dan, and that song also contained the name Crimson Tide (See: Abstract connections with blue deacon)
  1. Originally known as the Ultramorph, this final incarnation of the PROMETHEUS mutations was always intended to be a missing link of sorts between this film and the other entries in the Alien series. Effectively the unholy offspring of all the infected victims who came before it. Ridley Scott dubbed this creature the Deacon, based on the pointed shape of its head, similar to a Bishop's head-dress. This creature was originally intended to have more screen time, pursuing Shaw and David to the second Juggernaut ship, narrowly missing them as they leave the planet. (Prometheus Blu-Ray gallery notes)
  2. The original Alien's trademark secondary jaw can be found in more undeveloped form with the Deacon. Based on the long protrusible jaw of the deep sea Goblin Shark, the Deacon's secondary jaw ends the film with the nightmarish hint of possible horrors to come. (Prometheus Blu-Ray gallery notes)
  3. Interviewer: What was your approach with the Proto-Alien that emerges from the Engineer?
    Martin Hill: Similar to the baby trilobite, the deacon was a real puppet built for the performance on set, so we started by replicating its build digitally. We quickly discovered that we needed to augment the model considerably for articulation of the muscles and joints to make it feel more like a natural, physical creature. Ridley wanted the secondary mouth animation to reference the action of a goblin shark, which can dislocate it’s jaw and launch it forward to catch its prey. We needed to redesign the whole mouth and lower jaw to give the structure to build in the mechanics of this action. For this we went back to reference Giger’s original work and added in his details, which our sculpting team led by Florian Fernandez designed.
    Interviewer: Can you tell us more about the challenge of its particular skin?
    Martin Hill: The deacon’s skin is slightly pearlescent. We wrote a custom shader for the way the pearlescense reacts with the light. There is also a layer of blood, mucus and liquid all over the skin, which gave us a layered shading model to get the complexity of the material qualities of the skin. The lighting was a continuation of the strobing lighting and was artfully matched to the clean plates by leads Florian Schroeder and Adam King. (http://www.artofvfx.com)
  4. Neither combatant survives. When the battle con­cludes, both lie inert until the Engineer’s body erupts as another lifeform hatches, created from a cocktail of human, Engineer and trilobite DNA. “We called it the ‘deacon’ because the head was shaped somewhat like the hat of a deacon,” said Neal Scanlan. “It represented the beginning of Giger’s alien, although It did not directly resemble that creature. We went through a long design process with Ridley, who was really throwing the Giger card out there, trying to see what we could come up with.” Ivan Manzella and Julian Murray created the deacon sculpture over a weekend late in the production schedule. “We went straight to a full-sized sculpt. Ridley came in several times to give us feedback and direction, and we ended up with a creature about the size of a six-year-old child.” Scanlan’s team built two versions of the deacon, a soft puppet that fit inside an embryonic sac, and an articulated rod puppet, both produced in silicone. Supervising mold modeler Daniel Meaker compressed the soft puppet into a three-foot-diameter latex bal­loon, and then added a mixture of metallic and organic based pigments and silicone birth matter. The balloon fit inside a hollow animatronic dummy of the dead Engi­neer, which Vanessa Bastyan and Catherine Fleming fabricated with an articulated ribcage and internal organs. Puppeteers operated the Engineer dummy from beneath the set, causing the body to convulse and emit the newborn. “The deacon’s pointed head burst through the ribcage and split it open.” related Scanlan. “Then, with an enormous heave, it rolled out onto the floor like a calf being born. We then brought in the rod pup­pet, which had a lot of visible controls, but Ridley loved it. He ignored the technicalities and just went with it.” Stammers staged clean plates of deacon camera setups, but the birth played mainly as a practical effect with digital enhancement. “The first shot after the birth is practical, with rod removal,” noted Richard Stammers. “We then went to full CO; but the puppet served as blocking for performance, and we matched the CO ani­mation to the puppet.” Weta replicated the deacon and augmented tendons in the creature’s neck, which tense as the creature stands on fragile legs and then emits a roar, revealing a telltale second innerjaw. (Cinefex 130)

"Doctor Who and The Tomb of the Cybermen"
echoes in "Prometheus"?

leading from 



a) Comparisons to Doctor Who and The Tomb of the Cybermen

Comparisons can be made by between Prometheus and an old Doctor Who series "Tomb of the Cybermen" starring Patrick Troughton as the Doctor shown on TV in 1967. What it comes down to is the story of scifi twist on a Mummy horror film featuring an archeological expedition soon hijacked by the accompanying power hungry people who funded it an it's who want to bargain with the sleeping cyborg giants that have been asleep for hundreds of years in a tomb like complex but the cyborg giants don't give in to their plans.



b) Discovery of the ancient tomb

In Tomb of the Cybermen,  humans from Earth would be out to look for the remains of the Cybermen's civilisation on the desert like planet of Telos. Rather than a siege story, the writers came with a story about a trap for only the cleverest human to spring for the benefit of the cybermen who were going to convert him into a cyberman making use of his intelligence.  The story was also inspired by the interest in Egyptology, mainly interest in the tomb of Tutenkhamun. The writers turned to the old Universal Horror movie The Mummy starring Boris Karloff back in 1932 which was remade in 1959 with Christopher Lee as the mummified pharoah who is resurrected from the dead by a group of archaeologist , and seeks to resurrect his lover an Egyptian princess

c) Deep Frozen Cybermen

The cybermen had put themselves into a frozen state to survive and the human race would be drawn in by their inquisitiveness. What actually forced them to do this wasn't really made clear. Because the Doctor had destroyed their planet and then their machinery and supply of replacements had depleted, they were becoming extinct. Something that seemed to be important at the time of the making of this Doctor Who story was the fact that there was a big rumour in the newspapers in 1966 about Walt Disney's body been frozen, put into a state of cryogenic suspension, waiting for a cure for cancer and Walt Disney would have a second coming.

Christopher Lee and Peter Cushion
in Hammer's The Mummy (1959)


d) Von Danikenization
So with that there seemed to be a lot of interest in Erich Von Daniken investigating where spacemen could have landed and his book Chariots of the Gods would come out in 1968, the years after Tomb of the Cybermen was released. Gerald Davis back then was aware of Daniken's concept that there was the idea was that Spacemen in Pre-History had perhaps left clues which the human race would find out when they had advanced to a sufficient stage and this was the general idea behind Tomb of the Cybermen. The humans in the story only got inside because of their knowledge and primitive people would not have been able to get in, so the Cybermen would have use it as a trap to get these intelligent people and use them. It seemed almost as if the Prometheus scriptwriters had read the scriptbook for the Tomb of the Cybermen and noticed the Davis' words about about how the Cybermen left clues for the human race to find , pertaining to Von Daniken's idea.






In Prometheus,  the characters Elizabeth Watts and her partner Charlie Holloway archeologists discover reoccurring signs of a pattern in a cave painting and ancient tablets and other forms of ancient art.  It's assumed that these images being left behind as an invitation and once the human race had advanced enough, they might considered to be the strange circles in the pictures to be star systems and find one that looks similar leads to them to a planet across the galaxy.  And so they encounter a place that is a building left behind by another civilisation on a seemingly barren and deserted planet, and perhaps with the discovery of dead bodies, it might be nothing more than a tomb. As it happens though, when the humans awaken the sleeping giant, he doesn't seem to be interested in them at all other than having an urge to swat them like flies

e) See: Wreckless behaviour as catalyst for further events 

http://alienexplorations.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/prometheus-wreckless-behaviour-as.html


f) See: Hammerpede's Origins in Dr Who And The Tomb of the Cyberman's Cybermats

http://alienexplorations.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/prometheushammerpedes-origins-in-dr-who.html



g) Making a deal with the biomechanical giants
In Tomb of the Cybermen, Kaftan a member of the Brotherhood of Logicians, along with her colleague Klieg, and they have financed Doctor Parry's expedition to Telos, they turn out to be interesting in nothing but the actual Cybermen rather than the interior of the tomb like building. It comes to a point where Kaftan and Klieg hijack the mission with the use of force. Klieg working out the controls revives the Cybermen who have been in hibernation for 500 years. The leader is a fairly gigantic humanoid perhaps looking about seven foot, and the Klieg wants try to bargain with the Cyber Controller to gain power but in doing so meet their own doom. The Cybermen are an intelligent possibly humanoid race, who have replaced most of their body parts with plastics and mechanical parts. Their leader the Controller who is the most threatening of all, appears like a seven foot giant.
The Cybercontroller with enlarged veined dome.
The Cybercontroller grabs Klieg by the arm and almost crushes it, reducing him to his knees before throwing him backwards on the ground. The cybermen have set this whole thing as a trap to bring people of superior intellect in so that they could be turned into cybermen.

One of the Earth spaceship pilots who asks what they're going to gain from all of this. Kaftan replies "We are going to build a better world "

The Cyber Controller's plans are only to transform the human race into more cybermen


In Prometheus,  Once David has discovered a living giant asleep in his Egyptian sarcophagus like hibernation crypt, Peter Weyland the man who has built Weyland Corporation whose company slogan is "Building better worlds" is the person who has financed the expedition and has been revived from hibernation. This tall humanoid wears a suit that appears to be organic and technological but one can not work out wear it ends and the giants own flesh begins. Peter Weyland immediately takes over the expedition and to wake up the giant out of his hibernation and ask him how to extend his own life, but since the giant human is angered and everyone he can lay his hands on.

And then as it seems that the Engineer only has plans to take off in his spacecraft to travel to Earth and unleash on it a cargo of black stuff that perhaps will transform the human civilisation perhaps in the way that Fifield and Holloway had both begun to transform.



Source Quote
  1. This time the writers did not want to imagine a future rocket base or moon station, but get to explore Telos, the world of the Cybermen. For once , this was not going to be a siege story since the object was for the humans to get inside the base. Whether they would emerge from it depended upon the whims of the writers, They took their starting point  a classic horror movie called The Mummy, a film made in 1932, and remade more recently in 1959, where a group of archaeologists wake up an ancient evil. In the case of the Cybermen, it was going to be a trap for only the cleverest human to spring. It was a chance for the writers to imagine elaborate set up, and for Gerry to explore his favourite fear of claustrophobic tunnels based on a childhood experience in a coal mine, Above all , it gave them a chance to write another spooky horror serial, with a healthy dose of melodrama added to the mix. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  2. Egyptology is a very attractive image for children, so the deserts of Egypt would be the basis for the sandy wastes of Telos. There would be a sarcophagus of sorts in the Cybermen's recharging room, and bas relief illustrations of Cybermen were plastered all over their base. Since mummies are embalmed dead with some of their internal organs removed and kept in jars. It does not stretch the imagination too far to imagine how this relates to the Cybermen. They were to be found frozen in suspended animation within ice tombs deep below the surface of their city. Inevitably they would be awoken , and emerge from their tombs in a set piece scene. "There was something very evocative of the image of the Cybermen being all frozen up and breaking through the honeycomb-like membranes, "Gerry Davis explain in 1988. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  3. The Planet Telos , Five hundred years after the Cybermen were believed to have died out, a group of archaeologists from Earth visit the creatures' adopted planet and search for the entrances to their city. They uncover, instead , what appears to be their tomb. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  4. The Doctor, Jamie and Victoria join them in their exploration of the antechambers and Victoria finds an inactive device which the Doctor describes at a Cybermat. Upon discovering that their rocket has been sabotaged, the crew members are forced to spend the night in the central chamber. Possibly motivated by curiosity, the Doctor surreptitiously helps Eric Klieg to solve the logic puzzle at the main controls, and the gateway to the underground tomb swings open. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  5. The Doctor and his friends descend a ladder into the freezing tomb, and Klieg's fellow logician Kaftan closes the hatch behind them. Once underground, Klieg activates the levers that awaken the cybermen. They slowly emerge from their honey comb-like cells closely followed by the imposing form of their controller. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  6. The cybermen controller orders the release of the rat-like Cybermats to attack the humans on the other side of the hatch, but Klieg and Kaftan are undeterred. Klieg takes an x-ray laser from the weapons testing room, and opens the hatch. He keeps the Controller at bay with the gun, and offers him an alliance. The weakened Controller agrees, and Klieg allows him to stagger into a revitaliser for some much needed energy.(The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  7. Toberman follows the controller out of the tomb, but it soon becomes clear that he's been partially converted into a Cyberman. Toberman turns on the controller and Cybermen begin to swarm towards the reopened hatch. Jamie repels them with the X-ray laser, but the death toll leads the Doctor to a grim conclusion. Preparing to seal the Cybermen in their tomb forever, he once more descends underground. (The Tomb of the Cybermen, Marcus Hearn, The Essential Doctor Who: Cybermen)
  8. This time the writers did not want to imagine a future rocket base or moon station, but get to explore Telos, the world of the Cybermen. For once , this was not going to be a siege story since the object was for the humans to get inside the base. Whether they would emerge from it depended upon the whims of the writers, They took their starting point  a classic horror movie called The Mummy, a film made in 1932, and remade more recently in 1959, where a group of archaeologists wake up an ancient evil. In the case of the Cybermen, it was going to be a trap for only the cleverest human to spring. It was a chance for the writers to imagine elaborate set up, and for Gerry to explore his favourite fear of claustrophobic tunnels based on a childhood experience in a coal mine, Above all , it gave them a chance to write another spooky horror serial, with a healthy dose of melodrama added to the mix. (The Quest for Pedler: The Life & Ideas of Dr Kit Pedler)
  9. Egyptology is a very attractive image for children, so the deserts of Egypt would be the basis for the sandy wastes of Telos. There would be a sarcophagus of sorts in the Cybermen's recharging room, and bas relief illustrations of Cybermen were plastered all over their base. Since mummies are embalmed dead with some of their internal organs removed and kept in jars. It does not stretch the imagination too far to imagine how this relates to the Cybermen. They were to be found frozen in suspended animation within ice tombs deep below the surface of their city. Inevitably they would be awoken , and emerge from their tombs in a set piece scene. "There was something very evocative of the image of the Cybermen being all frozen up and breaking through the honeycomb-like membranes, "Gerry Davis explain in 1988. (The Quest for Pedler: The Life & Ideas of Dr Kit Pedler)
  10. Naturally, Kit build his own versions, Mark Pedlar remembers 'Dad used to build electric cats, mice, little Heath Robinson devices, very sophisticated for those days that would react to light. They were on wheels and their heads would move. He used to bring them home."
    (The Quest for Pedler: The Life & Ideas of Dr Kit Pedler)
  11. Gerry Davis : Tomb of the Cybermen was all very Freudian, with the symbolism of going down into the catacombs. It was an old-fashioned horror story with the breaking of the foetal membranes an added touch. That also gave us more scope with the Cybermats, who were based on silverfish. Although we devised them thinking mainly of the merchandise, they were also pretty horrific, with red eyes and the ability to leap up at you. (https://drwhointerviews.wordpress.com/category/gerry-davis/
  12. The original concept for the story was that, for an unspecified reason (following a presumably calamitous defeat), the Cybermen had retreated to their Tomb, their main idea for this story was that there had been lay a trap, designated to operated only after beings of a certain level of intelligence located the entrance to the tombs. (Doctor Who Scripts: The Tomb Of The Cybermen)
  13. Gerry Davis: At the time, there was a lot of interest in Erich Von Daniken investigating where spacemen could have landed. The idea was that Spacemen in pre-history had perhaps left clues which we would find out when we had advanced to a sufficient stage. This was basically the idea behind the Tombs. They only got inside because of their knowledge - primitive people could not get in. The Cybermen could then use the intelligent people. That was the theme, the trap... (Doctor Who Scripts: The Tomb Of The Cybermen)

Prometheus: aliens in suits that look like aliens

 Leads from: 

"Engineer" sized space jockey suit
a) Once we have seen the film, we understand that Ridley Scott has been telling us that the Space Jockey we had seen in the original Alien film was a suit. There might still be a way to turn the idea around because of the dissimilarities between the space jockey in Alien and the space Jockey suits in Prometheus.
engineer sets the controls from his seat

b) However Ridley asked the question and out of that came the answer that it must have been a suit and for Ridley this happened around 1995, or near enough twenty six years after Alien going by Ridley's memory.

engineer as his helmet is being put on

c) What ideas were these floating around in Hollywood at the time?  My own explorations about the matter brought me to think about the alien space suits seen in the movie Fire In The Sky back in 1993, but this movie was preceded by the film Communion which featured the idea of aliens that were suits containing a different sort of an alien within and a few years before that, there was the TV series V which featured reptilian extra-terrestrials disguised in an outer body that looked like a normal human. A few years after Communion, Fire In The Sky came out featuring a concept that was similar and this was later followed by Independence Day which developed the idea even further of an alien in a space suit that might have been mistaken for an alien life form itself. 
Refer to: Prometheus: The "Space Jockey as a suit" question links


d) See also : The Standing Engineer Spacesuits

Quote sources

  1. (37:35) Simon Mayo: Now as we have people spalling back in their minds to this character that you're talking about, this is the, there's a mysterious being this giant creature, I know it became known as the space jockey, but erm, could you, could you just describe him so that people can picture him.
    (37.53) Ridley Scott: "He was perceived, the giant was perceived as skeletal and erm, I kept staring at the skeleton which was kind of a wonderful drawing by H R Giger, and erm, then I thought, twenty, thirty, twenty, actually twenty six years on (1995?), I thought what if this is not a skeleton, but, because we only see it as a skeleton, because of our own, the way we see things in our own indoctrination, and er now I thought, what happens if its another form of protection or a suit? If its a suit then what's inside the suit" ( Mark Kermode and Simon Mayo's Film reviews, BBCRadio 5 live, 01 June 2012.)
    engineer with head encased in helmet
                                      
  2. Often Scott will have a trigger image in mind when he begins prepping a film. With Prometheus  it was the Space Jockey. "The big guy sitting in the seat, " he recalls.
    'Somebody said it's a skeleton and I said it doesn't have to be, it could be a degraded suit. It's only you saying that because you think you're looking at bone structure and a rib cage. Why isn't that a suit? It's been lying there disintegrating for two or three thousands of years in deep cold, that could be a suit. The suit works great as a kind of organic, very sophisticated spacesuit." (Prometheus: the art of the film, p20))                                               

Prometheus: The standing Engineer Spacesuits


"Engineer" sized space jockey suit

(Source: Prometheus :The Art of the Film)
"Engineer" sized space jockey suit

(Source: Prometheus :The Art of the Film)

"Engineer" sized space jockey suit

 (source: Prometheus :The Art of the Film / http://www.kerry-brown.com/)
Suit images that appeared in Entertainment Weekly as a detail in a photo
"Engineer" sized space jockey sui
Noomi Rapace sitting on a step ladder in front of the Space Jockey suits 
(Source: Prometheus The Art Of The Movie book)
stuntman Florian Robin posing
by suits in the corridor. 
(source Flostunts website)

Possibilities of merging the
universes of Blade Runner and Alien

leading from
a) Prometheus Easter Egg


P.WEYLAND/PVM/CXM?LOG=CGR/2-90.01.11/ TRS-MARS_pkd92

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/Dictated by not read/BEGIN

A mentor and long-departed competitor once told me that it was time 
to put away childish things and abandon my "toys." He encouraged me 
to come to work for him and together we would take over the world and 
become the new Gods. That's how he ran his corporation, like a God 
on top of the pyramid overlooking a city of angels. Of course, he 
chose to replicate the power of creation in an unoriginal way, by 
simply copying God. And look how that turned out for the poor 
bastard. Literally blew up in the old man's face. I always 
suggested he stick with simple robotics instead of those genetic 
abominations he enslaved and sold off-world, although his idea to 
implant them with false memories, well... "amusing" is how I 
would put it politely.

Fortunately, I chose a different trajectory, employing 
innovation and ingenuity when launching the Weyland 
Robotics Division. Even our earliest synthetics displayed
tremendous intelligence, intuition and compatibility 
despite their admittedly unconvincing exterior. But now several"  
(Prometheus Blu-Ray set)

b) Explanation from Charles De Lauzirika
Without any direct reference to Blade Runner or characters from the film, Charles De Lauzirika who produced the Prometheus blu-ray set decided to write a piece as an "Easter Egg" to add to Prometheus Blu-Ray set as a tongue in cheek reflection of the idea that Blade Runner and Alien take place in the same universe and worked as an in-universe frame work for the viral pieces that came out with the film. Those who watched Blade Runner will know that Eldon Tyrell's building was in the form of a pyramid that overlooked an LA of the future. However there were those who took literally

c) The ongoing questions
The question about Alien and Blade Runner taking place in the same universe has been asked ever since Blade Runner came out (see Alien's relation to Blade Runner ) But other than to two bearing similarities because of Ridley's thoughts about the future at the time, and that creatively they could be merged together and he would even refer to the android in Alien as a replicant, he never got at far as thinking about the two movies really being part of the same universe.

In one version of the script old man Weyland had
some serious heavies accompanying him in secret
cryostasis. Costume study. Yes, that's a compact
version of the Aliens pulse rifle. Yes, his uniform
says Batty. (http://www.benprocter.com/)

However when it came to making the movie Prometheus, thoughts were beginning to change

As it went through conceptional design stages , Ben Proctor recollect that one day Ridley Scott came in one day and say "You know, I'm thinking what if it's the Weyland-Tyrell Corporation? Is that cool?" "

Those around him responded "Dude, that's really cool. You gotta do it!"  

Scott continued "Maybe the bodyguards, you know, that come out with Weyland, maybe one of them says Batty on his uniform." referring to Roy Batty from Blade Runner

And so those who were in the room sitting around responded " Awesome! Do it, do it!"

And so Ben Procter was sad that they never got around to doing it. He appreciated the idea of the compatability between the dystopian futures of Blade Runner and Alien so that they might be the same universe. If they had a Weyland-Tyrell Corporation which later becomes a Weyland-Yutani it might be suggestive of the forever shifting nature of corporate mergers.








Source Quote
  1. Now, is the excerpt actually canon in the Alien/Prometheus universe? Not really, says de Lauzirika:
    "That was me having fun and being cutesy. I wrote all that stuff. I actually said this at the press conference they had in London, which is that if it's in the film, it's canon. I would argue that the viral pieces that are included in the Peter Weyland Files are canon just because they originated with Ridley and Damon Lindelof. I would say those, to some degree, are canon. But anything else - especially these which are kind of like little cute, embedded text graphics on the menus - I wouldn't take those too seriously. It's just meant to be an in-universe framework for those viral pieces."
    He apparently got the idea from fans online trying to connect the dots between the two acclaimed sci-fi universes, and thought he would have a little fun to see if anyone would catch on. Of course, everyone did:
    "As a Blade Runner fan, and because there's been so much talk before this even occurred with people on the Internet speculating that maybe Alien and Blade Runner and Prometheus could all exist in the same universe, it was just more of a wink at that. Absolutely nothing to be taken seriously. I mean, I sent it to Ridley and he had no comment. [Laughs] So, it's just icing on top of icing. It's not the cake. It's a fun, little side thing that's very superficial. And, by the way, it in no way officially establishes that it's Blade Runner because, if a lawyer were to comb through that, there's no reference to Tyrell or anything in Blade Runner. It's just a very lightly intentioned joke." (http://www.blastr.com/2012/10/prometheus_dvd_producer_r.php)
  2. Charles De Lauzirika: I wrote that Weyland journal exclusively for the Blu-ray menus and the tongue-in-cheek connection between the Alien/Prometheus and Blade Runner universes in that particular text was made entirely by me with absolutely no intention of it being official canon. It's just for fun which is why I didn't mention Tyrell or replicants by name. However, if you watch the Prometheus enhancement pod titled "Merging Ridleyverses," you'll see that Ridley briefly considered making a more direct connection but even then it wouldn't be meant to be taken too seriously. That connection never came to pass, so there you go. (Charles Lippincott's Facebook page
  3. Ben Proctor:There's one idea that I'm very sad that we didn't do. Ridley, one day, came in and said, 'You know, I'm thinking what if it's the Weyland-Tyrell Corporation? Is that cool?' And we're like, 'Dude, that's really cool. You gotta do it!. Maybe the bodyguards, you know, that come out with Weyland, maybe one of them says Batty on his uniform. but I thought that was a really cool thing that there is such a compatibility between the sort of, you know, dystopian future of Blade Runner and Alien that they may as well be the same universe. And if we're doing a Weyland versus a Weyland-Yutani, why not have corporate mergers shifting and make some kind of a connection there. I thought that was cool." (Merging Ridleyverses.(This information is taken from other people's transcriptions of the information in the capsule but I will personally check it properly when I find my copy of the Blu-Ray)