Prometheus Creature Designs

leading from
Prometheus

1) The Hammerpede
1) introducing the Hammerpede  2) The facehugger centipede

2) Babyhead
 1) Carlos Huante's Babyhead 
2)Origins of Carlos Huante's Babyhead 
3) HR Giger's Babyhead 
4) Neville Page's Babyhead (still to come)
5) Ridleygrams of Beluga Head

3) Fifield Monster
1)The Fifield Monster, 2) Ivan Manzella's Fifield Monster,  
3) H. R. Giger's Fifield Monster, 4) Alternate Fifield mutant, 
5) The final mutant Fifield, 

4) The Trilobyte
Chihuly - Chihulien - Chihulybite

5) The Utramorph
Carlos Huante's Ultramorph

6) Giger's Alien Beast 

Prometheus: The Fifield Monster

leading from
Fifield Monster

a) The idea was that the black slime emitted from the Ampules while in the pyramid overnight with Millburn, Fifield (Sean Harris) transforms into a creature that was jokingly referred to as 'Babyhead" by the crew.
b) All they ideas that they did with their designs, they tried to anchor down with real world references and so they could have the idea that it wasn't such a fantastical thing that they were doing with their Fifield design because they were after realism.. Neil Scanlan would compare Fifield's deformities to the real life condition of Elephantiasis, which is a swelling of body parts due to tropical worm infection, usually the limbs, and the limbs appear large and puffy or even elephant like and this could also happen to the face..

Facial Elephantiasis

Facial Elephantiasis

c) However over Ivan Manzella's desk was a picture of the Joseph Merrick also known as the "Elephant Man" who was thought to have had Proteus syndrome.

the photo of Joseph Merrick also known as 
"The Elephant Man as seen in the above image

d) However the final Fifield looks more like something from a Ralph Steadman caricature for Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas

The final mutant Fifield
(Prometheus: The art of the film, p136)


Ralph Steadman's illustration for the Lizard Lounge from "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas".

  1. "Infected by black slime emitted from the Ampules while in the Pyramid overnight with Millburn, Fifield (Sean Harris) transforms into a creature that was jokingly referred to as "Babyhead" by the crew. "Fifield was considered to be the mid-point between the Hammerpede and the Deacon, "reveals Neal Scanlan of its positioning in the genetic cycle Creature designer Carlos Huante worked on the initial designs for the Fifield monster, which was originally more alien than human before the mutated head and body were refined into something more recognisably Harris, albeit a twisted version of the actor." (Prometheus: The art of the film, p134)
  2. "Everything we've done on the film has a real world reference, "notes Scanlan, "and when you do your research, it's so sad because Fifield isn't really that much of a fantastical creature. These things happen in real life, like Elephantiasis." (Prometheus: The art of the film, p134)


Prometheus creature by Neville Page
Prometheus creature by Neville Page
Initial drawing of Fifield monster perhaps in earlier stage of transformation 
by Carlos Huante (Prometheus: The Art of the Film, p134)
Initial drawing of Fifield monster perhaps in  earlier stage of transformation 
by Carlos Huante (Prometheus: The Art of the Film, p134)

Alien 5: Sharlto Copley or not?

leading from




a) The Repeating Conversation
Sharlto and Neill often had the conversation everytime Neill ends a movie and he tells Sharlto that he wants to put him in the next one but he can't because it doesn't make sense to do all the movies with him. So he had done District 9, Elysium and Chappie all with Sharlto as a major character, although in the latter film it was through motion capture performance as the robot so the viewer wouldn't have seen him, but somewhere else in the movie his own face pops up.

b) The high possibility of no Sharlto
So Neill said that Sharlto would not be in Alien 5 but he would know more at the time the movie is made and Sharlto on May 9th was still still acknowledging this as the decision. Now experienced with performance capture, perhaps he could could be put in as one of the aliens and no one would know. Despite this Sharlto remained very excited that Neill was going to do something with the Alien franchise since it was something special to Neill.

Quote sources
  1. MTV. I'm very curious and I don't know if people talk to you about this, Neill tweeted recently this amazing artwork that he had created I guess for a potential Alien film. Was this something you guys discussed. 
    SIGOURNEY WEAVER: We did we chatted about it 
    MTV: When was it years ago or what?
    SIGOURNEY WEAVER: And he is a great fan
    MTV: Was this recent or what?
    SIGOURNEY WEAVER: Erm, we started chatting about it, like, the first day of Chappie
    MTV: So this came during Chappie
    SIGOURNEY WEAVER: Yuh, and er, erm, you know, I don't know what's going to happen with it, but obviously it couldn't be in better hands than with Mr Blomkamp
    MTV: I mean, are you optimistic, this is obviously the question that's, that follows you every day about, (it keeps coming back to you , yuh(?))
    SIGOURNEY WEAVER: You know, I never think about it, erm, I never wanted to manufacture a sequel, I don't think that works, but this happened very organically, and I know that he is one of the greatest fans. I think he wore those VH or tapes out, 
    MTV: VCR
    SIGOURNEY WEAVER: VCR tapes out, 
    MTV: Yeah, yeah, yeah
    SIGOURNEY WEAVER: but when he was a kid, so there's no greater lover of these movies than Neill so we'll see what happens
    MTV : Can you say anything about what his take was, I mean the fact that there's an image of Hicks in there, the fact that there's obviously you in a xenomorph kind of intermingles
    SIGOURNEY WEAVER: It's a pretty amazing story. We'll see what happens
    MTV: I was just on with Sigourney and I wanted to know, obviously you guys sort of you know, your friends, friendly with Neill, I have to ask you this, do you guys all talk about this Alien project together, do you know what's up going on with it, because she said, like, this sounds amazing this project that we're talking about.
    Sharlto Copley: I do because I'm friends with him, you know
    MTV: That's what I figure . So I want to go to you. I know you can't say anything but
    Sharlto Copley:  I can tell you but I'd have to kill you
    MTV: Hah, that might be worth it.  
    Sharlto Copley: Yuh
    MTV: How cool does this sound. Does it sound amazing?
    Sharlto Copley: It might be worth it, that's what's so. I don't think it's worth dying but I mean, maiming, 
    MTV: I'd have problems
    Sharlto Copley:we can maim you it's probably worth that. 
    MTV:  .... piece of leg
    Sharlto Copley: It's probably worth losing a leg
    MTV: A piece of leg for a Neill Blomkamp Alien movie
    Sharlto Copley: There you go, you know, There you go
    MTV: Would it be amazing, would it make my life
    Sharlto Copley: Dude, spectacular
    MTV: Right
    Sharlto Copley: Yuh, Yuh, That was like my favourite franchise of of of all time in science fiction
    MTV: Of course
    Sharlto Copley:  Yuh
    MTV: Genius. Um, tell me about
    Sharlto Copley: The first three
    MTV:  Yes, yes
    Sharlto Copley: First two really
    MTV: I even like Fincher alright ((Sigourney Weaver Discusses The Possible Neill Blomkamp 'Alien' Sequel | MTV 13 Feb 2015)
  2. With the announcement a few weeks ago that Neill Blomkamp's sequel for Aliens has been greenlit by Fox, the next logical question is whether the director's long-time friend and lucky charm, actor Sharlto Copley (District 9) will be involved.
    In our exclusive interview with Copley today, we asked the actor (who is promoting his lead role in Sony's Playstation Network series Powers) if he's talked  with his friend about when, or if, he's going to saddle up in the Sigourney Weaver-starring sequel.
    "We've had the conversation," he said with a smile in his voice, "But it's the familiar conversation with Neill every time he ends a movie where he tells me he wants to put me in the next one but he can't because, practically, it doesn't make sense to do all of his movies with me. At some point, he has to go away and then we'll return and do something which I fully understand. I never expected to be in all his films for two seconds."
    The problem is that Copley has actually appeared in all of Blomkamp's features, even the recently released Chappie, for which the actor did the motion capture performance of the sentient robot.
    "I've been arguing with him that Chappie doesn't really count," Copley laughed, "because people can't see me, so they don't know that it's me. However, I do actually have a cameo in Chappie, which I don't know if anyone has spotted. You see my face for a brief second, which was Neill's idea."
    As to our initial question, Copley did clarify that "at the moment, no. I'm not in the Aliens [sequel]. But I'm super-excited he's doing it, and it's surreal to get to see him do something with a franchise that for him and I was one of our favorite all-time franchises."
    When we suggested he could do another mo-cap performance as a xenomorph, Copley perked up and said,  "You know he could put me in as a xenomorph and no one would know. We know that I can do good performance capture, now. Neill starts out very determined, but you never know as he gets closer to the time."
    Sharlto said he's going to start with some reverse psychology soon, pitching to Neill, 'OK, dude you know how people loved Wilkus (District 9), Kruger (Elysium) and Chappie. I'm just saying all three characters landed with the audience. If you want to go without me, you can. There are other actors. You can use them if you like,' the actor laughed.
    We say run with it, Sharlto. (http://www.blastr.com/9th March 2015)
     

Alien 5: Blomkamp's video initiation

leading from 
 
a) Umhlanga TV Mystery
Neill Blomkamp's family owned a holiday flat in the coastal town of, called Umhlanga, next to  Durban and when he was about five or six years old, he once saw forty minutes of the film on TV, the earlier part of the movie showing scenes of the space ship, egg silo, the space jockey, and up to the chestburster scene, and suddenly his family wanted to go down to the beach, he suddenly lost control of himself because he wanted to watch the movie. Having seen this forty minutes of the film, he would never get to see it again for several years.

Lighthouse at Umhlanga beach front

b) The VHS machine at the bottom of the apartment block
Years later, he discovered that there was a VHS machine at the bottom of the apartment block, and the woman at the base of the building would cycle films that were filtered through all the different flats, and eventually it got to the point where he was asking "what is that you were playing?" and it took two years for him to get to the bottom of the whole matter in a pre-internet age. Later he would also see Aliens which would become his favourite film,  and during the years that video tapes were used, he watched these films over and over again so many times that he wore them out.

Source quotes
  1. SIGOURNEY WEAVER: You know, I never think about it, erm, I never wanted to manufacture a sequel, I don't think that works, but this happened very organically, and I know that he is one of the greatest fans. I think he wore those VH or tapes out, 
    MTV: VCR
    SIGOURNEY WEAVER: VCR tapes out, 
    MTV: Yeah, yeah, yeah
    SIGOURNEY WEAVER: but when he was a kid, so there's no greater lover of these movies than Neill so we'll see what happens
    ( (Sigourney Weaver Discusses The Possible Neill Blomkamp 'Alien' Sequel | MTV 13 Feb 2015)
  2. Neill Blomkamp: You know, ironically the first film that I've seen in my life was Alien and it was in a coastal town in South Africa that we used to have like sort of a holiday flat in , called, Umhlanga, it's next to Durban, and I saw like, I was really young, I mean, I was probably six or five, and I saw maybe 40 minutes of it and then my family wanted to go down to the beach and I think I was spazzed like fully because I wanted to keep watching it and then over the years I found out that there was a VHS machine at the bottom of the apartment block that the woman at the base of the building would like cycle films that were filtered through all the different flats, and I was like "what is that you were playing?", you know, it took me like two years actually to get to the bottom of it, like this pre-internet, like, super young phase. So, yuh, it was Alien, I had no idea what it was. 
    Interviewer: And were you, were you terrified by it by (then)?
    Neill Blomkamp: I, I, I , er, I saw everything up until the chestbursting scene, right so it, most of it, like my memory of it, was in the ship, with the eggs, and the er, the space jockey, like that was the image that that, and then I didn't see it again, like it was forty minutes and then I never saw it for like several years, so I did, the scary fact wasn't in there yet. (Total Film ,"Neill Blomkamp: My Life In Sci-fi" https://www.youtube.com, 5 Mar 2015)

Alien5: Blomkamp's further yearnings for Alien

leading from  
 
a) Further yearnings

Twentieth Century Fox had no idea that Blomkamp was developing an Alien 5, so in that sense, what he was doing was completely unsanctioned and just basically for fun, although it wasn' just for fun to Blomkamp, because it was what he wanted to do next and he spent a long time doing it, so in his opinion there was a lot of effort that went into it, and when he came back to Vancouver, he had an entire year to work on the film, so he got into developing the entire movie along with the artwork
while he was taking brakes between the post-production of his movie Chappie winding down and visual effects getting under control.

In February 2015, the issue was suddenly becoming whether Blomkamp felt like directing another film rather than whether he wanted to direct an Alien movie because he had wanted to make an Alien movie for years and years and within the same month, it was declared that it was officially his next film.

He was concerned about finding himself being told "Well we think in this film this should happen because it happened in that one"

But his own thoughts were " I’m just not going to do it, I’m just going to put it out."

But when he spoke to Sigourney Weaver, and she wanted to execute the story that he wrote and thought it was the right story for Ripley. and so his thoughts were "Nah, I'm fully going to do this".



b) Alien Life Cycle Glasses as a portent

When Neill got back to Vancouver in 20014, unclear of what he wanted to do, he found that his artistic compass was driving him to Alien. There he was is own home full of Alien memorabilia, and his wife Terri Tatchel who's also his screenwriting partner , was drinking from a glass one morning when he was readying to go to edit Chappie,  it showed the life cycle of the alien on the glass, and Terri was looking at it and Neill was still saying " I don't know what to do".

Terri responded "Look, look at what you make me drink my orange juice out of every morning. Is there something wrong with your brain? I'm drinking out of a glass that has a frigging facehugger on it. And you don't know what you want to do next?"

Then then pulled out of the cupboard the rest of these glasses that depicted brutal scenes from the movies and she said "you make your daughter drink out of these cups , this is a sign"

Neill responded "Mmm, you have a point"

What appealed to him about making a movie in the Alien world  was that he would be dealing with Freudian terror, such as the idea of going down dark passage ways with the chance of something coming around the corner and terrifying the viewer on the level of some primal neolithic cavemen getting hunted by a lion. This was Blomkamp's goal. He saw how Cameron did it with more aliens and more guns, while Ridley did it with slow burning.

Source Quotes
  1. Neill Blomkamp: So when I went back to Vancouver for 2014 unclear of what I wanted to make, I knew that my artistic compass kept driving me to Alien. Whenever I wasn’t needed on Chappie, I spent time on Alien, to the point where I hired my own concept artist and fleshed the entire movie out, basically. Even then, I still didn’t know if I wanted to do it.(http://www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=43633, 6th March 2015)
  2. Neill Blomkamp: When I came back to Vancouver, I had an entire year to work on 'Chappie.' And when I wasn’t needed in the edit, I could think about 'Alien.' So, I basically developed an entire movie and I did all of this artwork as well, I produced way more art than I put out. (http://blogs.indiewire.com/ 10th February 2015)
  3. IGN: Is this the first film to be green-lit via Instagram?
    Blomkamp:
    I don’t know – it’s an interesting question. Maybe. That’s a very interesting question.
    IGN:
    But you put that art out there…
    Blomkamp:
    The thing that I find… it kind of ties in a little bit with what you were saying about living up to people’s expectations, and are you nervous. This is a little bit of the same discussion where I think that people think I was playing some kind of game with the studio where I was releasing stuff to try to create hype to try to go back to them. I’m totally not Machiavellian in that way at all. I’m just not. The debate was an internal debate actually. It was a debate where… I don’t think I’m a movie director. I think I’m an artist, and for me movies are the pinnacle art form. But the pinnacle art form requites 10s of millions or 100s of millions of dollars of other people’s money that needs to return an investment for them on their cash. And that means that there are certain things that come with that that limit you as an artist. So you can have full control on a film – Chappie is as close to having virtual carte blanche on a film as you can have, less the fact that it’s two hours, and it has three acts. And, and, and, and… there’s a list, right? So it’s like if you want to create a thing that’s a piece of art that just really winds people up – something hyper offensive or crazy or whatever it might be – this is the wrong thing for you.
    I have that internal debate sometimes where I’m wondering if this is the right avenue for me. That’s what Alien was where I was like ‘Maybe I should just go off for a couple of years and do some other stuff.’ And I had all of this accumulated work of a project that I thought was really awesome. I was like ‘I know there are going to be some fans out there who like this – here you go!’ You know what I mean? And that’s kind of what happened. So nothing is pre-meditated. I still hadn’t picked a project. 2014 was really weird for me. I loved Chappie and I loved working in post on Chappie – working with [Hans] Zimmer, cutting it together, working on VFX – it was very relaxing and it was kind of awesome. But I didn’t know what I was going to do next. I came up with so many ideas. I came up with like many films and I couldn’t choose one.
    My apprehension with Alien was that I had never worked with someone else’s material. And not even someone else – at this point it was like… I’m going to count Fincher in with the third one, even though the third one I don’t like as much as the first two. But they’re all three awesome filmmakers. So it’s not about living up to it and being nervous about it, I just don’t want other people to tell me what to do. Which is a different thing. ‘Well we think in this film this should happen because it happened in that one.’  That kind of scared me a little bit so then I was like ‘I’m just not going to do it, I’m just going to put it out.’ But then I spoke to Sigourney [Weaver]. And I love Sigourney and her wanting to execute the story  that I wrote, and she thinks it’s the right story for Ripley. So I was like ‘Nah, I’m fully going to do this.’ And also my place looks like this [points to geeky memorabilia on IGN shelves] – with all this stuff everywhere, so Terri
    [Tatchell – Blomkamp’s wife and screenwriting partner] was actually drinking a glass in the morning when I was readying to go edit Chappie recently, and it’s the life-cycle of the xenomorph on the glass, and she was looking at it, and I was like ‘I don’t know what to do’ and she was like ‘Is there something wrong with your brain? I’m drinking out of a glass that has a frigging face-hugger on it. And you don’t know what you want to do next?’ Our house is covered in xenomorphs, so I was like ‘Mmm, you have a point.’(http://uk.ign.com/articles/2015/03/04/how-district-9-director-neill-blomkamp-got-the-alien-gig)  
  4. Neill Blomkamp: I saw Sigourney again, and her enthusiasm in it, and me still not knowing what I was doing... Well, the thing that actually made it really clear was that we have xenomorphs all over the house [including drinking glasses depicting graphic scenes from the films]. No bullshit, that actually is what made me realise that there’s a massive portion of my brain that’s taken up by the world of the xenomorph. And I’m like, ‘Hmm. Valid point.'"(http://www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=43633, 6th March 2015)
  5. Interviewer: There is a kind of xenomorph shaped alien in the room which we've talked about a little bit, but obviously you're making an Alien movie, next, Neill, ahm, really fascinated by how that came about, cause obviously your release concept art onto the internet, erm, I assume you've been having conversations with Fox about that before that it wasn't just a kind of..
    Neill Blomkamp: No....No, no, no,, it wasn't actually like, I er 2014 was a really weird year for me because, erm, like I, I usually know quite decisively what I want to do and in the process of post on chappie, I didn't know exactly what I wanted to do and I had a, and I had a bunch of different for different films , but my, my favourite, on like a gut instincts but on like an artistic level was Alien by a long way, but I had thos sort of like inhibiting mental road block about, erm, just wanting to, you know, kind of work on my own stuff and not not be held accountable for really by, whether it's the studio or by fans or whoever, I just want be left alone to do my stuff, that's just kind of a big deal to me, but what happened was, even if you go back three or four years, I've wanted to make a film in that genre, in that, in that franchise you know for ages, and, I had come up with an idea and then, when I met Sigourney on set, I, I assumed that she would never want Ripley again, rightly or wrongly, I just, for some reason had that in my head, and , and also I didn't know where she could go with her, given Alien 3 and 4, and so, when I started speaking to her , erm and she was just, I just wanted to know about the process of making the first two films, 'cause the first two are the ones I care about, and I was like what she thought and everything else, yuh, I started to realise that there actually was a whole, at least a film if not more, that still contained Ripley, which I was really surprised by, and, and so when i went back to Vancouver and I had my weird year of 2014 if not of being totally clear of what I wanted to make, I knew that my artistic compass kept driving me to Alien and, and I spent like, whenever I wasn't needed on Chappie, I spent a lot of hours working on Alien, you know, and unto a point when I hired my own concept artists and liked fleshed the entire movie out basically and I still didn't know if I wanted to do it and, and then I just like one night came to the conclusion that I was like, I mean this is like an ongoing thing with us all the time where, you know, I,  like, she's always like, "no, you'll go back and do a film" and I'm always like, "Nah, this is the last film do" like I genuinely believe it's the last film I'm going to do
    Terri: Sometimes I patronize him, I'm like okay, here you are, that's good.
    Interviewer: We always need more hands in the restaurant
    Terri; Yuh, exactly
    Neill: But erm, so, I was so convinced that I wasn't, I, I didn't even think a norm...  like any film, let alone a large studio film
    Interviewer: Yeah
    Neill: But I was like, it came from a place of like love, and it came from a place of me being a fan, and, and I was like, if I'm a fan, then other fans should see the stuff, just at least gives one person's take on it, you know, and I put out, I just put out a bunch of art, but I still hadn't decided what I was going to do next, and then so you see, Fox didn't know and then after, like I saw Sigourney again, and then her enthusiasm and me still not knowing what I was doing, it becomes kind of clear, the thing actually that made it really clear, tell them what happened, this, this is actually the binding thing for me, we have xenomorphs all over the house
    Terri: But, but, well, he's humming and hawing going back and forth and, and , finally I said, "look, look at what you make me drink my orange juice out of every morning", and I pulled out of the cupboard... we have these, set of glasses that have like these brutal scenes from the movies and I was like "you make your daughter drink out of these cups , this is a sign"
    Neill: and then that that no bullshit, that actually what made me realise, that's like my whole, like there's like a massive portion of my brain that's like taken up by the world of the Xenomorph and I was like Mmm, that's like a valid point. (http://www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=43631)