The Creature

Leading from 
Alien


2) Ridley Scott's Alien Monster
a) Into The Necronomicon
b) Looking for the Alien's Nucleus
c)  The Sudanese
d) Bolaji Badejo from the Gold Coast
e) The Salamander People
f) The Chestburster
g) The Facehugger
h) The Egg
i) Paintings that inspired the big Alien
j) Roger Dicken's big alien
k) Creating the Alien

l) Human to Spore stage
m)  An intermediary stage 

n) The Alien as a folded up box 
o) Saliva Story

The Space Jockey

leading from :
The Alien
 

At the beginning of the Alien production, the corpse of alien pilot was known as the alien pilot. Giger's his diaries freely refers to the crew of the Nostromo as Space Jockeys, but eventually the name The Space Jockey stuck on the alien pilot and today when people might talk about a Space Jockey in science fiction, often they're referring to the alien pilot in Alien and the original open use of the term perhaps since Robert Heinlein's scifi novel from 1947 "The Space Jockey" has almost been forgotten


  1.  Roots in "Swiss Family Robinson"
  2. Early Designs for the Space Jockey
  3. Unlocking the design of the Space Jockey
  4. The Space Jockey's Story


The Planetoid

Turkish Pyramid Dwellings

Plans for Turkey
When the silo and the derelict were still perceived as separate Scott had planned at stage one to film part of Turkey where people lived in large pyramid structures, but this didn't cut to budget and keep everything safe in the studio. Was he talking about the strange mounds of Cappadocia? Or perhaps the cone dwellings of Harran?
  1. Ridley: I'd seen looking at some spots for another picture that would have been beautiful for Alien , particularly in Turkey where there are these pyramid like dwellings - huge, mountainous structures which cover hundreds of square miles. Absolutely extraordinary. But it was a practical budget decision not to go away on location, so we just did what we could in the studio. (Cinefex 1, p64, 1st para)

dwelling s made from the fairy chimney rock formations of Cappadocia

the fairy chimney rock formations of Cappadocia

Cone Dwellings of Harran in Turkey
Cone Dwellings of Harran in Turkey
Cone Dwellings of Harran in Turkey

Claw Room - Temple Environment

Leading from 
The Nostromo

a) The Claw
Originally the Nostromo was to have undercarriage featuring tapered rollers, then it was changed to a landing foot and later that became a claw and Ridley wanted a huge claw room down in the bilge of the ship where the ships feet would be retracted during flight, like an anchor cable tier on an ocean liner

The Claw (images taken from the film and merged on Photoshop)
b) The Temple Environment
Ridley Scot decided to transform the landing leg room of the Nostromo into a temple environment
Roger Christian went out and bought two Canberra bombers and dismantled them.  The jet engines became the columns of the room which gave it the feel of a temple. Inspired by the way the Apollo Lunar Lander was partly covered in gold foil, the walls of the room accompanying the vehicle; land crawlers, helicopters and other flying machines and equipment that the crew would use in their work on and around the refinery, and when they land on various planets. were covered in gold paint would become like "the Egyptian treasures". Tutenkhamun's treasures would still have been fresh on the minds of the public at the time


c) The Claw as an Idol
The landing leg itself becomes the idol that almost filled up the room but remained suspended in the air. Ridley wanted to see the landing leg, the "claw" the idol seen through the gap between the massive doors as big as the wallls. The "claw" would be so big that it almost touched the walls but was still hanging in the air.


The Claw as seen from the rafters (image taken from the film)

d) Reference to Heath Robinson
He also mentioned Heath Robinson in his comparison, an artist who drew cartoons featuring unlikely machines, and so his name entered the language as a description of any unnecessarily complex and implausible contraption.

Heath Robinson cartoon
e) Connection with another temple environment
As it happens, the derelict space craft is also a temple in this way, with the space jockey as a central idol (which becomes interesting in view that the Space Jockey chair and occupant are inspired by the Henu Barque which would have taken central place in its own chapel) and becomes connected to the claw room temple by a piece of music played in both environments.

Space Jockey a central idol of a temple environment


Source quotes:
  1. Fantastic Films: In the film the landing foot is a claw like thing, but in the storyboard it's a tapered roller

    Ridley Scott: This is how these things change. After I thought about it for a while I decided not to have these huge steel rollers. Eventually it developed into a foot and the foot became a claw after a while longer. We ended up using the claw in two places. Somehow when one does a storyboard, you can suddenly work out a method to show how big the ship is( Fantastic Films #11, p28)
  2. Ridley Scott: I wanted a huge claw room down in the bilge, where the ship's feet would be retracted during flight, like the anchor cable tier on an ocean liner. (Fantastic Films #11, p34)
  3. Ridley Scott: As I was working with the art director I decided to make it feintly glittery, I wanted to have anodized gold everywhere. Not steel,gold. Did you know that space landing craft are covered with gold foil. Amazing! So I thought, Why make this out of steel? Let's make it all warm, oppressive, massive and gold. (Fantastic Films, #12, p25-26) 
  4. Ridley Scott: We got hold of marvelous actual parts of actual huge jet engines and installed them, and they're like coppery metal with some steel. We used them as four main supports, like columns, and they give a lot of feeling of a temple. We played the same music we used in the derelict alien craft and we had two temples. The idol I wanted was through these massive gold doors which were as big as a wall, with a gap in them through which the claw can be seen, When the set was dressed, it looked like Aladdin's cave. (Fantastic Films, #12, p25-26)
  5. Ridley Scott: The visual idea I had in mind was to fill the entire room with the "claw" so that it almost touched the walls and floor, but is still apparently hanging free in the air.  Just outside the claw room is a huge maintenance area, a garage, filled with the equipment that the crew would use in their work on and around the refinery, and when they land on the various planets - land crawlers, helicopterers, other flying machines. (Fantastic Films, #12, p25-26) 
  6. Ridley Scott: A lot of the stuff we used here, see that egg crating , that's all just standard, um, industrial pallets, we just created most of the sets out of the pallets, and the rest were tube and exotic looking pipe work and conduits from aircraft. In fact, at one stage, Roger Christian went off and bought two Canberra  bombers and just (58:00) dismantled them. And of course on each bomber is millions of parts.(Alien director's commentry dvd)
  7. Ridley Scott: These are jet engines standing on end. And we used all the stuff as essentially real, so I just got stuff. And this is like, I always thought was like Egyptian treasure.. treasure trove, this room, so I said the whole room should be gold, and so we made it, sprayed it all gold, and I got that really off the first moon landing vehicle which of course had all that, it looked like what I call in English Heath Robinson, kind of a simple lashup with a lot of copper, tin foil underneath to protect it and er, so we kept that in mind. (Alien director's commentry dvd)
  8. Ridley Scott: Just the remains of a helicopter there sprayed gold, er, jet engines there sprayed turned on end and sprayed gold with gold foil on them just to make it more peculiarly , um, hi-tech.  (Alien Quadrilogy and Blu-Ray commentary dvd)

Cosmic Incubation


a) In Time Out magazine back in 1979, Helen MacKintoch interviewed H R Giger and wrote an article about what he said rather than typing out the interview word for word, she made a reference to H R Giger referring to "Cosmic Incubation" and there was no more mention of this phrase

b) In Ancient Astronaut Special Edition Star Wars vs Alien, in the latter part of 1979, Giger mentioned that Mia named the movie The Cosmic Incubation

c) However 2013 when Giger's Alien Diaries were released, it was revealed that this came from a subheading for Alien that Mia came up with and Giger liked
  1. Time Out 7-13 September 1979: As the Nostromo party wander through the derelict's vaulted, dimly lit passages, they come to the vast and threatening silo, home of Giger's 'cosmic incubation.' Here he says, 'you can find the eggs, where it's coming from, the Evil.'
  2. H R Giger (August 29th 1978) : Mia found a good subheading for Alien in German "Alien - Cosmische Inkubation [" Alien Cosmic Incubation. ] (Giger's Alien diaries p519)
  3. HR Giger: Mia named it: The Cosmic Incubation (Ancient Astronaut Special Edition Star Wars vs Alien,  fall 1979, article: HR Giger The Nightmare Maker,p20)

Escher's visions etched on Brian Johnson's mind

From:

In one interview about his work on Alien, Brian Johnson the special effects supervisor, talked about Giger's original concept for the derelict being too hard to work out how to build because it looked like an Escher optical illusion, and later he talked with Ridley about the design for the Nostromo and showed him a perspective drawing of the top of the tower, under what context Ridley needed to see it is unknown. Was it something to do with the refinery towers? Whatever the reason, the sketch was described to be like an Escher optical illusion in the way of the drawing "Waterfall". However the subject of Escher's work at the time was seen to be a strong reference point for Brian going by the interviews.

Giger's Derelict preproduction painting (work 374: Wreck)
that bears qualities of an Escher drawing
Visit The M. C. Escher official website (http://www.mcescher.com/)

sources:
  1. Regarding Giger's original derelict design 

    Brian Johnson : "It's a wonderful design, but as it turned out, we couldn't build it. It was like an Escher optical illusion. As a two-dimensional painting  it look very logical, but there was not actual way you could build it in three dimensions."(Cinefex 1) ( see also Giger's work from The Design Of The Derelict)
  2. Building the Nostromo
    Brian Johnson
    :This was at Bray. Bray Studios. What I did here was, because Ridley is- Ridley is an ace sketch artist, that’s what he used to do before he became an art director, and before he got involved in other things – commercials. So he used to go away and on a bit of paper scribble, you know, I want it to look like this. And then Ron Cobb used to turn it into a 2-dimensional work of art. And then Ridley would say yeah that’s pretty good, I like that.
    Brian Johnson working on the Nostromo
    So in the end what happened was, I said, okay, and I showed him a perspective drawing/sketch of the top of the tower, which is one of those trick of eye things, so that it looks like the water is always going down the waterfall, but you know, if you follow it around at one point it has to… you know?
    So I said okay, do you want me to build this? Got the message, so I said, I’ll build you a small scale model of the Nostromo, and then you can do whatever you want to it. You can always cut it in half, extend it, you know. But if we start with sort of a 16-foot model, we’re never going to finish it. So that’s what I did. (http://www.originalprop.com/blog/2009/04/23/interview-with-brian-johnson-special-effects-artist-special-to-the-opb/)


The Realism of Giler and Hill's earlier drafts

Leading from : 
Alien

a) David Giler the producer, continued to rewrite the script numerous times over the Spring, rewriting until there was little resemblance to the original and he did not want Dan O'Bannon's involvement
Ron Shusett revealed in interviews extra information about various drafts of Alien that David Giler and Walter Hill wrote that went to extremes and during this time it was as if the alien ship, it's alien pilot's remains and the egg silo were disappearing or being totally transformed beyond recognition in pursuit of Hill and Giler's need for their sense of realism
depiction of Attila the Hun

b) In one description of the different drafts, the crew of the Nostromo would have the ability to call people from the past to fight the alien. In one instance they would call Hercules to fight the Alien and another instance they would call Genghis Kahn to fight the alien. In another description of the different drafts, the crew would be brought to fight past monstrous villains from history such as Attila The Hun and Jack The Ripper. As pointed out by the Ask Mr Kern radio program, the plot sounded more like the "Savage Curtain" episode of Star Trek.

Ridley had been approached with these different ideas from Giler and Hill. Shusett remembers Ridley as finding himself saying "I can't be here having to satisfy the different master, they want their draft shot and I'm choosing not to shoot that"
depiction of Genghis Khan
c) He also discussed the appearance of a futuristic bunker just made out of concrete and plastic and it looked as if some advanced race had a war there which echoes what Book of Alien mentioned about Cobb's painting of the "Black Ship and Cylinder" where searchers find a lost Earth base where previous travelers fought a losing battle with aliens.. In one instance Ron also talked about it being like a twentieth army bunker. The presence of a bunker linked in with the earlier script where a human made derelict space ship and a cylinder shape man made silo are discovered, and the aliens are most like a product of a man made experiment. The reference to the incarnation of the bunker was talked about by Ron Shusett when he was being told that the Space Jockey would be too expensive and instead they would show a bunker constructed at angles instead of a derelict ship. (See Landscape with alien astronaut corpse)

d) When  tried to take the derelict ship away and replace it with a bunker and reduce everything to their sense of realism, and the studio bosses were okay with that



Ridley responded "No no, they can't use space things with realism like that, okay.

He was keen to stay with Shusett and O'Bannon's draft instead with the exception of the robot head which came from Giler and Hill. 

Friction built up between the director and his producers Giler and Hill, and as a result, Giler and Hill felt antagonised and so eventually left the studios during preproduction because of the friction developing and Hill went off to direct another movie



Ron Cobb's"Black Ship and Cylinder"
Sources
  1. Dennis Fischer: Are they doing , without too many changes, your original script? Dan O'Bannon: Well, David Giler, who is one of the producers, sat down and just kept rewriting it all Spring, and just kept rewriting it, and rewriting it, and rewriting it 'til there was very little resemblance to the original screenplay, and then I wasn't allowed to participate in that because he didn't want me to. He was producer.  (Rocket Blast's comic Collector, no.148)
  2. See Ron Cobb's concept design for the derelict
  3. Ron Shusett: Regarding Giler and Hill, they did eight various drafts. And they went off in many different directions and so there were as different, I can’t even describe how many, so it was almost a different story many times. But it kept getting closer and closer back to the original cos the director kept thinking he liked the original better. For example, instead of the space jockey, they one time thought it would be, it looked like a futuristic bunker just made out of concrete and plastic and futuristic plastic and it looked like some advanced race had a war there. That was one idea they had. And so that you wouldn’t have that, replace that scene. Another idea they had let’s go really far out there, let’s have the ability to call people from the past to fight the alien. They would call Hercules or and it was ridiculous and everybody was laughing, ok this doesn’t work. They were trying, roping, you always have to see how far you can push the envelope. It got ridiculous when you got Genghis Kahn to fight the alien. So you can see how far apart it got. And then it got closer and like that bunker, but less spectacular. So they tried every level through eight drafts making it more outlandish to make it more realistic, but Ridley kept coming back to the structure we had which was working superbly in every way and they wrote a lot of dialogue that later remained, but structurally only one thing they did remained. And that was a masterpiece of an idea I thought. The second best idea in the whole movie.( report from what was additionally said in the interview for "Alien Evolution", 2001)  
  4. Ron Shusett: They wanted that to be an army bunker for some reason, I guess they just, "okay this will give it realism", and that's boring, you can't, you know, once you're committed to that, you can't go back to a steel, you know, twentieth century army bunker. It's, it's, it's, it's er... that goes backwards in imagination where as that Giger design which he hand painted, airbrushed that whole wall himself personally, like he did his artwork, and that's why it looks so eerie, and and er the creature inside it too, the crew called Space Jockey. So that was one thing where they wanted realism, and then they said, "okay", Ridley said, "no no, they can't use space things with realism like that, okay." Then they said, "we, more out there" and then they said something like, which sounds good on paper, but as you said, "we don't know the road not taken", their idea was somehow every past villain in history they would have to fight, somehow, Attila the Hun, ah, you know, ah, I can't even think of some of the classic, ah ah, classic monsters, not monsters, these were more human, famous historical villains, ah, that they would have to challenge at different times, not monsters, but people for, that were Hitler type people, people that were mass murderers, er, or or, some cases maybe a creature, but a creature that you, Jack the Ripper, well that was one of them. They wanted... Interviewer: What, are you talking about Alien?
    Ron Shusett: Yuh, so they, so that just threw it into a turmoil
    Interviewer: That's the craziest idea ever
    Ron Shusett: yes, pardon me
    Interviewer: That sounds like the craziest idea ever
    Ron Shusett: I know, it sounds crazy (http://www.askmrkern.com/page3.php October 27, 2012)
  5. Ron Shusett: And to Fox's credit, they looked at his commercials, they said this guy's a visual genius, we'll got with it. He shot that down. And there were other things he wanted to do which Ridley thought about hard and finally said "no no" these are just attempts, honest attempts, sheer attempts on your part to make it better and it's getting worse. So I'm gonna just go back to the Shusett - O'Bannon draft with the exception of the robot's head, and that, of course that antagonised them and then eventually they didn't choose even though they were... I was executive producer, and they were producers with Gordon Carroll, their third partner, but they eventually had to leave the location in preproduction because there was too much friction with the director and Ridley said, "I don't have... I can't be here having to satisfy the different master, there, they want their draft shot and I'm choosing not to shoot that", so they just decided to go back, and they both went back, and Hill went on to make another very good movie right after that himself.  (http://www.askmrkern.com/page3.php October 27, 2012)
  6. Ron Shusett: They said ''This is not your main set.''
    ''You're just gonna have to walk by and see a skeletal imprint in the mud of this 15-foot creature, and then you'll walk into this strange-looking building.''
    ''lt'll be a bunker or something that's constructed at angles.
    ''
    (Alien Quadrilogy Documentary)

Landscape with alien astronaut corpse

leading from : 

a) Ridley and the space jockey's coming and goings
When the derelict and the silo were combined, the presence of the remains of a dead pilot in its seat is to be found within the ship was being considered as no longer necessary due to the economic reasons.  The decisions to remove him and put him back numbered a few. Ridley Scott, Gordon Carroll and Ivor Powell wanted him in, they had become fully confirmed "space freaks" by then. They were already over budget and running about three weeks behind schedule which Ridley didn't think was unreasonable for that sort of a film. While it was going to be ditched, Ridley, Gordon and Ivor  held onto it,  Ridley thought that to have the explorers walk into the derelict pilot chamber and find nothing but just a hole in the floor was completely pointless. However, the alternative was to have a the impression of an alien body imbedded in a rock formation of the landscape outside of the derelict and Giger would be the one to design it. It was on May the 14th 1978, when Giger talked with Gordon Carrol and then Ridley Scott over the phone from his home in Switzerland, to visualise a new idea that they have for the script that would be to design the skeleton of the alien pilot that would be discovered amidst the alien landscape.




b) In Ridley Scott's storyboards, the explorers would walk past the body embedded in the rocks, the audience would see it and amongst the Nostromo crew only Ash the android would see an impression of thing in the transmission from the video camera while he remains on board the Nostromo during the exploration, and he rewinds the tape to have a closer look at the thing and says nothing. Later a clearer impression of the creature's face would be seen on the monitor




c) Blow-Up
 This idea was perceived as being like the Michelangelo Antonioni 1966 film "Blow-Up" , a movie where the director claimed that until the film was edited , he would have no idea himself what it would be about and perhaps not even then. The lead character would be forever blowing up photos that he had taken to uncover a murder and there he would find suggestion of a dead body of a human hidden in the bushes is only discovered once the negatives are developed, a film that Alien's production designer Michael Seymour had worked on. And Verushka,  a famous long limbed model of the time who appeared in the film also briefly considered to perform the role of the Alien long before the found Bolaji Badejo. 

Poster for Blow Up

lead character investigating photograohs
Photo vaguely revealing the dead body of a woman

d)  Ron Shusett and the Studios bosses' double dealings

The studios bosses that comprised of people such as Peter Beale, said to Ron Shusett "you can't put that set in".

Ron and the others said said "why?"

They said " It's only used once in the movie, it's not like your gonna come back to it. It's different if you keep using the set. This is massively expensive, this big creature, this big back wall. No, we can't give you this. lt's too expensive."
 
As far as Ron knew, it would have cost $500,000

They said" This is not your main set". However what they were able to offer him was an alternative ''You're just gonna have to walk by and see a skeletal imprint in the mud of this 15-foot creature, and then you'll walk into this strange-looking building. lt'll be a bunker or something that's constructed at angles.''  and a few empty spore cases would be discovered. This idea of a bunker seem to be the last stand for the construction bleeding through from Giler and Hill earlier drafts.

Ron replied"No, no, no. Look, you need... This is your Cecil B DeMille shot. You need to have this full scale built. You need to have this full scale built, so they know they're right there, so their jaw drops, so they say "This isn't some little Roger Corman movie made to look pretty good, this is one of the most amazing movies I've ever seen. "

Still the reply coming back was "No, you can't have it, it costs way too much"

For quite some time Dan and Ron was downhearted by the whole fact that they weren't going to have the space jockey set at all and they were just going to have to fake it with this ridiculous impression of the thing in the ground. On a day Ron decided to take a walk to the back of the studio which had about a dozen sound stages, and he walked to the back and saw to his surprise that the set was almost completed, he was confused since he was told that they were not going to have the dead alien pilot in its seat in the chamber. He thought that they had made a mistake and that the construction didn't get the message from the studio bosses in London and that they weren't supposed to build it. He kept his mouth shut and in another two weeks, it was completely built and then Ron went to Peter Beale who was second from the top and said to him "You built the set, the one you said couldn't afford to give us"

Peter Beale replied "Yeah we know, because as the The dailies looked so good day after day, and and Ridley kept begging for this , and we realised we should go, kit was worth the investment. But we didn't wanna tell you 'cause then you'd never stop asking.  Every single thing, ten other things, you'd want"

Ron thought this was quite  funny. He didn't think that Ridley knew about it for a long time either.

It was on July 5th 1978 that Giger would hear of the decision to put the alien pilot back in the cockpit again.

e) One leg or two?
In Giger's painting of the planetoid landscape (work 385) we see an image of the remains of a humanoid figure that would have been of the Space Jockey when they had decided to have it as something seen unnoticed on the surface of the planetoid landscape.  Once I knew about this detail, and looked at the image that Ridley Scott selected from Necronom V the concept of the Space Jockey which appeared to be this nearly humanoid skeletal thing with one limb where the two legs would be, (SEE: Space Jockey Evolution via Giger's Necronomicon pt, 1 ) So I began to wonder whether this space jockey corpse should have one lower limb or two.

Detail from painting of the planetoid landscape (work 385)
In 2013, Giger's Alien Diaries (7 & 8) were published and on page possible p42 of the actual book and page 23 of Giger's own diary number 7 was a drawing of the space jockey. This entity again looks as if it might have one limb for a leg or maybe the other one is hidden or it's just not clear, and one might think that it's cradled in the palm of a giant hand as if the rock shape at the bottom left is a thumb.

dead alien astronaut sketch from Giger's Alien Diaries

f) A missing concept painting
Ever since having seen the painting of the Alien landscape and noticed the dead space jockey detail,  I wondered if Giger had done any other drawings or paintings to explore further this corpse and over time began to wonder if the painting that Ridley Scott is seen standing in front of in photographs together with Giger and Gordon Carroll standing together. Surrounding shape in the painting also recall the surrounding rock formations that Giger sketched out in his pencil sketch. It was an image certainly of an alien space jockey type thing but in what context was not known, but the upper torso was obvious in the painting seen. It might well be the mentioned work 386 of the alien corpse detail before 386 became the designated number for the egg silo interior artwork.

photo from Giger's Alien, p12

detail from above colour photo
detail from above black and white photo

Source Quotes
  1. Ron Shusett: Giger's sets were so erotic, and... There's big vaginas, and penises. The whole thing is like you're going inside some sort of... womb, or whatever. lt's visceral and all of those things, and l think all those elements came into it, and that's what makes it really work. On the so-called ''Space Jockey'', which... Giger, by the way, designed that whole set, and he hand-brushed the alien, airbrushed it himself, and got on a scaffold and airbrushed the whole set so it would have that eerie texture. But the thing was this: it was too expensive a set, they didn't wanna give it to us.
    They said ''You're only in here one time. lt's different if you keep using the set.''
    ''This is massively expensive, this big creature, this big back wall.''
    ''No, we can't give you this. lt's too expensive.''
    l think it was, like, $500,000.
    They said ''This is not your main set.''
    ''You're just gonna have to walk by and see a skeletal imprint in the mud of this 15-foot creature, and then you'll walk into this strange-looking building.''
    ''lt'll be a bunker or something that's constructed at angles.
    ''
    (Alien Quadrilogy Documentary)
  2. This set cost a staggering amount of money. We built it full scale, and for its day it was just way hugely expensive. And for half the movie, they told us they wouldn't let us build it, the 15 foot tall so called space jockey and the walls and everything, and Giger hand airbrushed them, 'cause that was his artwork, on a scaffold. The creature and the whole thing. Besides his personal labour and effort just duplicating this and building this, they said "you can't put that set in".
    We said "why?"
    He said "it's only used once in the movie, it's not like your gonna come back to it. It's way too expensive. We'll just have him shoot a fifteen foot imprint in the clay of the creature as he's walking"
    And we said "No, no, no. Look, you need... This is your Cecil B DeMille shot. You need to have this full scale built."
    So they know they're right there, so their jaw drops, so they say "This isn't some little Roger Corman movie made to look pretty good, this is one of the most amazing movies I've ever seen.""
    They said, "No, You can't have it, it costs way too much"
    So they went on, we, you know, we were shooting the movie, we we thought they... we weren't gonna have to have the set at all, we were going to have to fake it and  have a stupid thing in the ground. And one day, the studio's so big, there are 10 or 12 sound stages and I walked to the back, and I saw the set was almost completed and it was up already.  And they told us we were not going to friggin have it in the movie. This was two thirds of the way through the movie. I thought they had made a mistake, that the contruction department didn't get the message from the high-ups in London, that they weren't supposed to build it. So I shut my mouth up. And in another two weeks later it was completely built, and it was completely built and I went to Peter Beale, who was second from the top and I said "You built the set, the one you said we couldn't afford to give us"

    He said "Yeah we know, because as the The dailies looked so good day after day, and and Ridley kept begging for this , and we realised we should go, kit was worth the investment. But we didn't wanna tell you 'cause then you'd never stop asking. (00:29:00) Every single thing, ten other things, you'd want"
    
So I thought that was kind of funny. I don't think Ridley knew about it for a long time either. I didn't know about it until it was completed.
  3. Giger: Saturday evening, May 14, 1978, 7.45pm, Finally received a phonecall from London. First talked with Gordon Carroll, then with Ridley Scott. They have a new idea for the script that I should visualize. The skeleton of the astronaut, which used to be in the spacecraft, should now be placed in the landscape, blending in so that it can't be distinguished, and the crew wouldn't it until they see it on the recorder, back in the spaceship. Like the film "Blow-up" where the figure hidden in the bushes is only discovered once the negatives are developed.(Giger's Alien Diaries, p173,)
  4. Giger: I finished the requested picture, Alien No. 385 of astronaut on landscape , + Detail No.386 (unfinished) (Giger's Alien Diaries,May 15th to 17th , 1978 p173,)
  5. Giger: Scott doesn't like the details of the skeleton. I have to rework the image. (Giger's Alien Diaries, May 18th , 1978 p173)
  6. Giger: They want the skeleton of the Alien space jockey to lie  in the cockpit again. This was communicated by Michael Seymour (Giger's Alien Diaries,  July 4th 1978, p241) 
  7. Ridley Scott : He was in and out. in and out, in and out. I wanted him in and so did Gordon Carroll and Ivor Powell. By then we'd become fully confirmed space freaks. But there were others who wanted it out, mainly for economic reasons. We were already over budget and running about three weeks behind schedule - which I don't think was unreasonable for that sort of film personally. So at one point, it was going to be ditched; but we rigidly held onto it. We felt we had to have it in there as a sort of a central element in the craft. I mean, to have them walk in there and find nothing - just a hole in the floor - was bloody pointless. (Alien the special effects, p36)